Discussion:
EU power grab: A hunk of Junck
Add Reply
BurfordTJustice
2017-09-13 10:18:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
EU power grab: A hunk of Junck

Go ahead, European Union. Keep throwing your weight around at the expense of
your 28 member countries. Make them do things they don't want to do, impose
penalties on any who challenge you, and call Brexit an anomaly. On
Wednesday, the president of the European Commission will do just that and
more.

Jean-Claude Juncker's annual State of the Union speech has three main
themes: that the massive influx of refugees from the Middle East and Africa
poses no threat to Europe's security overall, that the shock of Great
Britain's vote last year to leave the EU was a one-time aberrant event, and
that what the EU leadership really needs is tighter control over its
members, not more freedom to make their own choices.

"It is a belief that verges on the religious on the creation of their
project," says Nigel Farage, a member of the European parliament and a Fox
News contributor.
"We now have a European parliament that is more interested in its own
survival than that of its members. They think that Brexit and Donald Trump
were just short-term shocks that are now over, because Emmanuel Macron won
in France."

"We now have a European parliament that is more interested in its own
survival than that of its members. They think that Brexit and Donald Trump
were just short-term shocks that are now over, because Emmanuel Macron won
in France."

The latest episode of Eur-overreach is a ruling by the EU's high court that
Hungary, a member state, must accept a Euro-imposed quota of migrants from
the Middle East and Africa. Hungary's Prime Minister, Viktor Orban, has
maintained a hard-line policy of not allowing such immigrants into his
country, and quarantining any who make it past the border. Orban calls
immigration a "poison" that threatens European culture and likens Muslim
migrants in particular to a "Trojan horse for terrorism."

His approval rating, once a robust 80 percent, has been cut in half in the
past year, since he tried to regulate a university funded by Hungarian-born
socialist billionaire George Soros. But his stance on keeping immigrants
out is still supported by most Hungarians.

The power of the Brussels-based EU is its ability to force states to do what
it tells them. Letting Hungary resist its orders could set off a spate of
independent thinking - the last thing a deeply unpopular, self-created
bureaucracy like the EU can tolerate.

Orban means to do just that. "It doesn't matter what they might threaten
Viktor with," says Farage. "He will not bend."

Sounds like a tough-talking populist candidate who bucked the political
system in the United States last year. Whatever became of him?
abelard
2017-09-13 10:55:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 06:18:34 -0400, "BurfordTJustice"
Post by BurfordTJustice
EU power grab: A hunk of Junck
Go ahead, European Union. Keep throwing your weight around at the expense of
your 28 member countries. Make them do things they don't want to do, impose
penalties on any who challenge you, and call Brexit an anomaly. On
Wednesday, the president of the European Commission will do just that and
more.
Jean-Claude Juncker's annual State of the Union speech has three main
themes: that the massive influx of refugees from the Middle East and Africa
poses no threat to Europe's security overall, that the shock of Great
Britain's vote last year to leave the EU was a one-time aberrant event, and
that what the EU leadership really needs is tighter control over its
members, not more freedom to make their own choices.
"It is a belief that verges on the religious on the creation of their
project," says Nigel Farage, a member of the European parliament and a Fox
News contributor.
"We now have a European parliament that is more interested in its own
survival than that of its members. They think that Brexit and Donald Trump
were just short-term shocks that are now over, because Emmanuel Macron won
in France."
politicisation of the civil service

http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/uk/2017/07/jeremy-corbyn-emmanuel-macron-and-age-volatility
"In France’s recent legislative elections only 43 per cent of the
electorate voted –probably the lowest turnout in a national election
in its democratic history – due to uncertainty or suspicion. One
survey puts the level of Macron’s positive support at only 11 per
cent. His left-wing opponents have announced their intention of
shifting the contest from the ballot box to the street, and Mélenchon
has called for a “civic general strike”. Macron’s slick middle-class
populism might have to confront the tough populism of the old left. I
wouldn’t care to bet on the outcome."
...
"Quasi-Remainers of all parties are trying to strip the issue of
everything except “jobs and the economy”, blithely denying the
importance of democratic legitimacy, national sovereignty,
immigration, strategic security and the future of the EU itself...."
--
www.abelard.org
Loading...