Discussion:
heavy man...well more of that lost stuff in the universe now found...allegedly
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abelard
2017-10-10 16:31:14 UTC
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http://www.alphr.com/space/1007292/half-of-the-universes-missing-normal-matter-has-been-found
"Astronomers have a problem when it comes to the mass in the universe;
a lot of it is missing. You may know about dark matter, the enigmatic
substance thought to make up 27% of the universe, but this isn't the
only mysterious absence. When it comes to normal matter; the stuff we
are made of including protons, neutrons and electrons, there's also a
chunk missing. In fact, models of the universe hint there should be
about twice as much matter as we can see. This is called the missing
baryons problem.

Now, two papers have come out suggesting we may have found half of
this missing chunk, in huge stretches of hot, diffuse gas that hold
galaxies together."
--
www.abelard.org
ssos@bungay.com
2017-10-10 17:27:23 UTC
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Post by abelard
http://www.alphr.com/space/1007292/half-of-the-universes-missing-normal-matter-has-been-found
"Astronomers have a problem when it comes to the mass in the universe;
a lot of it is missing. You may know about dark matter, the enigmatic
substance thought to make up 27% of the universe, but this isn't the
only mysterious absence. When it comes to normal matter; the stuff we
are made of including protons, neutrons and electrons, there's also a
chunk missing. In fact, models of the universe hint there should be
about twice as much matter as we can see. This is called the missing
baryons problem.
Now, two papers have come out suggesting we may have found half of
this missing chunk, in huge stretches of hot, diffuse gas that hold
galaxies together."
--
www.abelard.org
Have you not included neutrinos?

While not accounting for all dark matter, they could be a large percentage of the total.

Neutrinos used to be considered to have zero mass, but now it is known they have slightly above zero mass. This may seem to be silly, but given that one supernova can spew out around 580 billion neutrinos the negligible mass starts to add up.

10 to the power 23 neutrinos will pass through you in an average lifetime.
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Basil Jet
2017-10-10 19:02:46 UTC
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Post by ***@bungay.com
Post by abelard
http://www.alphr.com/space/1007292/half-of-the-universes-missing-normal-matter-has-been-found
"Astronomers have a problem when it comes to the mass in the universe;
a lot of it is missing. You may know about dark matter, the enigmatic
substance thought to make up 27% of the universe, but this isn't the
only mysterious absence. When it comes to normal matter; the stuff we
are made of including protons, neutrons and electrons, there's also a
chunk missing. In fact, models of the universe hint there should be
about twice as much matter as we can see. This is called the missing
baryons problem.
Now, two papers have come out suggesting we may have found half of
this missing chunk, in huge stretches of hot, diffuse gas that hold
galaxies together."
--
www.abelard.org
Have you not included neutrinos?
While not accounting for all dark matter, they could be a large percentage of the total.
Neutrinos used to be considered to have zero mass, but now it is known they have slightly above zero mass. This may seem to be silly, but given that one supernova can spew out around 580 billion neutrinos the negligible mass starts to add up.
10 to the power 23 neutrinos will pass through you in an average lifetime.
Is that all? That's less than Avogadro's number. I'd expect more than
that in a minute.
ssos@bungay.com
2017-10-11 10:52:45 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by ***@bungay.com
Post by abelard
http://www.alphr.com/space/1007292/half-of-the-universes-missing-normal-matter-has-been-found
"Astronomers have a problem when it comes to the mass in the universe;
a lot of it is missing. You may know about dark matter, the enigmatic
substance thought to make up 27% of the universe, but this isn't the
only mysterious absence. When it comes to normal matter; the stuff we
are made of including protons, neutrons and electrons, there's also a
chunk missing. In fact, models of the universe hint there should be
about twice as much matter as we can see. This is called the missing
baryons problem.
Now, two papers have come out suggesting we may have found half of
this missing chunk, in huge stretches of hot, diffuse gas that hold
galaxies together."
--
www.abelard.org
Have you not included neutrinos?
While not accounting for all dark matter, they could be a large percentage of the total.
Neutrinos used to be considered to have zero mass, but now it is known they have slightly above zero mass. This may seem to be silly, but given that one supernova can spew out around 580 billion neutrinos the negligible mass starts to add up.
10 to the power 23 neutrinos will pass through you in an average lifetime.
Is that all? That's less than Avogadro's number. I'd expect more than
that in a minute.
Are you really that obese?

Anyway, "nil point" for rushing to Wikipedia in order to provide your stereotypical put down post.
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abelard
2017-10-10 19:37:56 UTC
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Post by ***@bungay.com
Post by abelard
http://www.alphr.com/space/1007292/half-of-the-universes-missing-normal-matter-has-been-found
"Astronomers have a problem when it comes to the mass in the universe;
a lot of it is missing. You may know about dark matter, the enigmatic
substance thought to make up 27% of the universe, but this isn't the
only mysterious absence. When it comes to normal matter; the stuff we
are made of including protons, neutrons and electrons, there's also a
chunk missing. In fact, models of the universe hint there should be
about twice as much matter as we can see. This is called the missing
baryons problem.
Now, two papers have come out suggesting we may have found half of
this missing chunk, in huge stretches of hot, diffuse gas that hold
galaxies together."
Have you not included neutrinos?
While not accounting for all dark matter, they could be a large percentage of the total.
Neutrinos used to be considered to have zero mass, but now it is known they have slightly above zero mass. This may seem to be silly, but given that one supernova can spew out around 580 billion neutrinos the negligible mass starts to add up.
10 to the power 23 neutrinos will pass through you in an average lifetime.
not without my permission they won't!!
--
www.abelard.org
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