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osborne/may demonic dream
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shutemdown
2017-10-11 04:42:03 UTC
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"Seventy-five years on, however, the good work done by the Beveridge
Report is in grave danger of being entirely undone. The “five giants” are
creeping back into the mainstream of our daily life. As they do, our
productivity crashes through the floor. Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began. What would Beveridge find if he were to
report today?"

Want, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness: are Beveridge’s five
evils back?

v
shutemdown
2017-10-11 04:42:28 UTC
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https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/oct/10/beveridge-five-evils-welfare-state
shutemdown
2017-10-11 04:43:47 UTC
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George Osborne has landed job number seven (and eight?): visiting fellow
at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution and dean’s fellow at its
business school. Those jobs in full:

Washington Speakers Bureau after-dinner speaker
Adviser to Blackrock
Chairman of Northern Powerhouse Partnership
Fellow at McCain Institute
Editor of the Evening Standard
Economics professor, Manchester University
Visiting fellow at Stanford University
This one, unusually, is unpaid. Though Stanford did pay him £30,000 for a
speech last year.

https://order-order.com/2017/09/20/osborne-lands-job-number-7/
m***@btopenworld.com
2017-10-11 09:16:29 UTC
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Post by shutemdown
"Seventy-five years on, however, the good work done by the Beveridge
Report is in grave danger of being entirely undone. The “five giants” are
creeping back into the mainstream of our daily life. As they do, our
productivity crashes through the floor. Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began. What would Beveridge find if he were to
report today?"
Want, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness: are Beveridge’s five
evils back?
But shutyermouth, we are not tripping over diseased bodies lying in the street. literacy rates are not falling. In fact sales of conventional books are rising despite e-literature. General living standards are at an all time high and thee are more people in work now than ever.

Be a good chap and don't exaggerate.

Productivity this year is down 0.1%. It's barely measurable

The employment market always is selective. When an employer decides to cut his workforce, he does not get rid of his most vital, highly skilled, loyal, reliable etc. workforce. He takes the opportunity to cull his crud.

Similarly when he is recruiting he discriminates towards what he sees as the best on offer. Unemployment has now been falling month on month for months. We are perhaps reaching the point when all that is on offer is essentially that same crud. They are therefore being recruited into the workforce not so much out of desire as necessity. Good employees are becoming increasingly difficult to find and are soon snapped up.

Given that this is the situation then it is inevitable that this crud is now having a highly marginal effect on the productivity figures.

So what can a employer do to improve the quality of his work force? The most obvious thing He can do is raise his pay rates so as to give himself a competitive edge over other employers. However, as a business man he is aware that he must keep an eye on his costs too and there is a limit to how much he can afford to pay and this is set within the local employment market.

Anyway, since average wage rates are apparently not rising in line with inflation, not many employers are 'upping' their pay rates.

The second way is through investment. Don't buy a floor weeper a broom, buy him a sit upon rotary sweeper that will do the work of a half a dozen or more floor sweepers. Don't give an office worker a typewriter. Connect them to a computer network. Don't provide a fitter with a spanner. Give him a power tool so that he can tighten nuts as fast as the job permits and so on.

The advantage of investment is that once made the rate of its depreciation comes nowhere near the cast of wage rates. The downside is that personnel have to be capable of using all this equipment. This has implications of a need for training. Taking personnel away from the productive process to show them how to make the best use of the equipment they use. Flexibility and experience become employee attributes also.

Whichever course of action our notional employer chooses, the problem of productivity is addressed. Unless he does address it, he will make less and less profit and eventually go out of business.

You will notice that BAe have come to the conclusion that the route to preserving or improving their overall productivity is to rid themselves of nearly 2000 of their work force. Of course, this is a hardship for those concerned but it is not the raison d'être of any company/business to provides jobs which are incidental to any product.

The irony is that in one office employees will having their redundancy pay assessed whilst in another, possibly in the same building, young men and women will be waiting for interview to become apprentices etc. They will be building the next generation of BAe products. BAe will not go out of usiness.
7
2017-10-11 10:24:37 UTC
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Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by shutemdown
"Seventy-five years on, however, the good work done by the Beveridge
Report is in grave danger of being entirely undone. The “five giants” are
creeping back into the mainstream of our daily life. As they do, our
productivity crashes through the floor. Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began. What would Beveridge find if he were to
report today?"
Want, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness: are Beveridge’s five
evils back?
But shutyermouth, we are not tripping over diseased bodies lying in the
street. literacy rates are not falling. In fact sales of conventional
books are rising despite e-literature. General living standards are at an
all time high and thee are more people in work now than ever.
Be a good chap and don't exaggerate.
Productivity this year is down 0.1%. It's barely measurable
Yea... from a starting base of 20% to 30% below the rest of the world.

The UK is just another socialist state with stealth socialist governance
and controls in place to kill productivity.

For the rest of the world, only 2 people needed get a job
done compared to UK's 3 persons needed with the equivalent
of one full person trolling around all day and a true
socialist loafing off others.

Even our pooliticians can't up their productivity with zero use
of intranet, wiki, whatsapp, blogs, irc etc and instead they
prefer to

stand up fastly
troll
sit down fastly

and are true socialists expecting to be paid for this service, including
expenses.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
The employment market always is selective. When an employer decides to cut
his workforce, he does not get rid of his most vital, highly skilled,
loyal, reliable etc. workforce. He takes the opportunity to cull his crud.
IR35 socialist taxation system designed to prevent free movement of labour.
Without wage inflation and free movement of labour there is no
productivity to be had from anyone. Socialist dream fulfilled!!
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Similarly when he is recruiting he discriminates towards what he sees as
the best on offer. Unemployment has now been falling month on month for
months. We are perhaps reaching the point when all that is on offer is
essentially that same crud. They are therefore being recruited into the
workforce not so much out of desire as necessity. Good employees are
becoming increasingly difficult to find and are soon snapped up.
Given that this is the situation then it is inevitable that this crud is
now having a highly marginal effect on the productivity figures.
So what can a employer do to improve the quality of his work force? The
most obvious thing He can do is raise his pay rates so as to give himself
a competitive edge over other employers. However, as a business man he is
aware that he must keep an eye on his costs too and there is a limit to
how much he can afford to pay and this is set within the local employment
market.
Anyway, since average wage rates are apparently not rising in line with
inflation, not many employers are 'upping' their pay rates.
The second way is through investment. Don't buy a floor weeper a broom,
buy him a sit upon rotary sweeper that will do the work of a half a dozen
or more floor sweepers. Don't give an office worker a typewriter. Connect
them to a computer network. Don't provide a fitter with a spanner. Give
him a power tool so that he can tighten nuts as fast as the job permits
and so on.
The advantage of investment is that once made the rate of its depreciation
comes nowhere near the cast of wage rates. The downside is that personnel
have to be capable of using all this equipment. This has implications of a
need for training. Taking personnel away from the productive process to
show them how to make the best use of the equipment they use. Flexibility
and experience become employee attributes also.
Whichever course of action our notional employer chooses, the problem of
productivity is addressed. Unless he does address it, he will make less
and less profit and eventually go out of business.
You will notice that BAe have come to the conclusion that the route to
preserving or improving their overall productivity is to rid themselves of
nearly 2000 of their work force. Of course, this is a hardship for those
concerned but it is not the raison d'être of any company/business to
provides jobs which are incidental to any product.
The irony is that in one office employees will having their redundancy pay
assessed whilst in another, possibly in the same building, young men and
women will be waiting for interview to become apprentices etc. They will
be building the next generation of BAe products. BAe will not go out of
usiness.
ssos@bungay.com
2017-10-11 11:03:05 UTC
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Post by 7
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by shutemdown
"Seventy-five years on, however, the good work done by the Beveridge
Report is in grave danger of being entirely undone. The â??five giantsâ?? are
creeping back into the mainstream of our daily life. As they do, our
productivity crashes through the floor. Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UKâ??s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began. What would Beveridge find if he were to
report today?"
Want, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness: are Beveridgeâ??s five
evils back?
But shutyermouth, we are not tripping over diseased bodies lying in the
street. literacy rates are not falling. In fact sales of conventional
books are rising despite e-literature. General living standards are at an
all time high and thee are more people in work now than ever.
Be a good chap and don't exaggerate.
Productivity this year is down 0.1%. It's barely measurable
Yea... from a starting base of 20% to 30% below the rest of the world.
The UK is just another socialist state with stealth socialist governance
and controls in place to kill productivity.
For the rest of the world, only 2 people needed get a job
done compared to UK's 3 persons needed with the equivalent
of one full person trolling around all day and a true
socialist loafing off others.
Even our pooliticians can't up their productivity with zero use
of intranet, wiki, whatsapp, blogs, irc etc and instead they
prefer to
stand up fastly
troll
sit down fastly
and are true socialists expecting to be paid for this service, including
expenses.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
The employment market always is selective. When an employer decides to cut
his workforce, he does not get rid of his most vital, highly skilled,
loyal, reliable etc. workforce. He takes the opportunity to cull his crud.
IR35 socialist taxation system designed to prevent free movement of labour.
Without wage inflation and free movement of labour there is no
productivity to be had from anyone. Socialist dream fulfilled!!
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Similarly when he is recruiting he discriminates towards what he sees as
the best on offer. Unemployment has now been falling month on month for
months. We are perhaps reaching the point when all that is on offer is
essentially that same crud. They are therefore being recruited into the
workforce not so much out of desire as necessity. Good employees are
becoming increasingly difficult to find and are soon snapped up.
Given that this is the situation then it is inevitable that this crud is
now having a highly marginal effect on the productivity figures.
So what can a employer do to improve the quality of his work force? The
most obvious thing He can do is raise his pay rates so as to give himself
a competitive edge over other employers. However, as a business man he is
aware that he must keep an eye on his costs too and there is a limit to
how much he can afford to pay and this is set within the local employment
market.
Anyway, since average wage rates are apparently not rising in line with
inflation, not many employers are 'upping' their pay rates.
The second way is through investment. Don't buy a floor weeper a broom,
buy him a sit upon rotary sweeper that will do the work of a half a dozen
or more floor sweepers. Don't give an office worker a typewriter. Connect
them to a computer network. Don't provide a fitter with a spanner. Give
him a power tool so that he can tighten nuts as fast as the job permits
and so on.
The advantage of investment is that once made the rate of its depreciation
comes nowhere near the cast of wage rates. The downside is that personnel
have to be capable of using all this equipment. This has implications of a
need for training. Taking personnel away from the productive process to
show them how to make the best use of the equipment they use. Flexibility
and experience become employee attributes also.
Whichever course of action our notional employer chooses, the problem of
productivity is addressed. Unless he does address it, he will make less
and less profit and eventually go out of business.
You will notice that BAe have come to the conclusion that the route to
preserving or improving their overall productivity is to rid themselves of
nearly 2000 of their work force. Of course, this is a hardship for those
concerned but it is not the raison d'être of any company/business to
provides jobs which are incidental to any product.
The irony is that in one office employees will having their redundancy pay
assessed whilst in another, possibly in the same building, young men and
women will be waiting for interview to become apprentices etc. They will
be building the next generation of BAe products. BAe will not go out of
usiness.
Definitely not, especially when we slap a 500% tariff on all US-built aircraft, in retaliation for the bleating over Bombardier having the nerve to undercut Boeing.
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shutemdown
2017-10-11 11:05:51 UTC
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idiot: the article states

"Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began."

are you disputing a journalist?

what are your sources idiot?
shutemdown
2017-10-11 11:39:51 UTC
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your writing is crap .. no attention to detail

wearying to read

you are a boring idiot

fuck off
m***@btopenworld.com
2017-10-11 11:55:27 UTC
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Post by shutemdown
you are a boring idiot
fuck off
Your powers of expression are astounding!
shutemdown
2017-10-11 12:20:11 UTC
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nothing you say, so labourously, means anything at all
within this ruined culture

you have nothing to say

your words are meaningless

you are an idiot

fuck off
m***@btopenworld.com
2017-10-11 11:52:51 UTC
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Post by shutemdown
idiot: the article states
"Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began."
are you disputing a journalist?
Depends upon the journalist and the journal.

You cite neither.
abelard
2017-10-11 12:47:37 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 11:05:51 -0000 (UTC), shutemdown
Post by shutemdown
idiot: the article states
"Full-year figures for 2015 show
the UK’s productivity gap with other countries standing at its worst
since modern records began."
are you disputing a journalist?
what are your sources idiot?
why do you care about 'productivity'?

many more people are in work...
'productivity' is calculated on the average production per person...
the more people in work tends to mean the more people of low
skills in work...

that naturally drives down the *average* productivity...

but it doesn't drive down the output of a unit...just the
reverse...


almost all gov't stats are pants...
--
www.abelard.org
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