Discussion:
Ken Dodd
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m***@btopenworld.com
2018-03-12 08:51:42 UTC
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Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.

"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."

Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their business 'in the halls'

Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself had composed), ventriloquists funny without being offensive. He entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never offensive or seeking to embarrass.

I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit! when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.

He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.

In this case it is true.
JNugent
2018-03-12 23:47:25 UTC
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Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself had composed), ventriloquists funny without being offensive. He entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit! when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
Too true.

I saw him once (in pantomime) in Liverpool (internet archives suggest
that this must have been his playing Buttons in Cinderella at the Empire
in 1956).

We saw him live just once more, at Southend a few years ago - the show
lasted from 19:30 to about 01:15.

Utterly brilliant. It was sad news in today's early hours.
Tim
2018-03-13 09:00:00 UTC
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Post by JNugent
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular
comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after
six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their
business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself
had composed), ventriloquists  funny without being offensive. He
entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never
offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit!
when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like
him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
Too true.
I saw him once (in pantomime) in Liverpool (internet archives suggest
that this must have been his playing Buttons in Cinderella at the Empire
in 1956).
We saw him live just once more, at Southend a few years ago - the show
lasted from 19:30 to about 01:15.
Utterly brilliant. It was sad news in today's early hours.
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last night. I
just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I know though
that he was a very popular comedian.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
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Joe
2018-03-13 09:34:10 UTC
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On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.

On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.

I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
--
Joe
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 09:42:21 UTC
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Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
TBH, I always thought he was a bit stupid.

What was all that 'Diddy Men From Knotty Ash', and 'How Tickled I Am'
nonsense?
saracene
2018-03-13 09:49:25 UTC
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Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
TBH, I always thought he was a bit stupid.
What was all that 'Diddy Men From Knotty Ash', and 'How Tickled I Am'
nonsense?
How tickled I am on a large scale.
Have you ever been tickled on large scale missus?

I never bothered much with himn but don't speak ill of the dead.

Benny Hill was genius.
JNugent
2018-03-13 16:34:48 UTC
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Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
TBH, I always thought he was a bit stupid.
We should all be that "stupid", especially with money and biological
longevity.
Post by johnny-knowall
What was all that 'Diddy Men From Knotty Ash', and 'How Tickled I Am'
nonsense?
"Diddy Men" was an old concept from Liverpool folklore and was not Ken's
personal invention. Many people of my grandmother's generation (born
around the turn of the century) would (or sometimes would) refer to any
short male as a diddy man. I heard that before hearing it from Ken Dodd.

The Knotty Ash side of it was all his and stems purely from the fact
that he lives/d in the former village of Knotty Ash, set between West
Derby and Broadgreen, all of which (plus others) were engulfed by the
expanding city boundaries in the forst half of the twentieth century.
Knotty Ash and West Derby are still easily recognisable on the ground as
having the forms of the villages they once were. This is particularly so
in the case of Thomas Lane, which is where Kens's lifelong home is.

"How tickled..", etc, is his patter. His Schtick. He was doing it in the
mid-1950s.
Tim
2018-03-13 09:48:55 UTC
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Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
https://join.worldcommunitygrid.org?recruiterId=123388
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 09:51:08 UTC
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Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?

I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
Tim
2018-03-13 09:56:52 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
https://join.worldcommunitygrid.org?recruiterId=123388
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 10:40:21 UTC
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Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.

I don’t remember that happening very often.

I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
saracene
2018-03-13 10:50:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight train fromn them,
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 11:28:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit
records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight
train fromn them,
I remember my mother doing that once, but was treated to so much derision
from us kids that she didn’t bother again.

Instead we listened to all the hits on pirate radio. Then my Dad acquired a
second hand tape recorder for me, and I recorded all the hits from pirate
radio.

A much cheaper and more satisfactory conclusion in the long run.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
JNugent
2018-03-13 16:54:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[ ... ]
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight train fromn them,
That is true, but I'm sure the PP wasn't referring to Embassy Records'
versions getting into the charts (they never did), but to separate
well-established singers each recording the same popular song simply
because it was popular. TYhere was a sub-genre of hit American records
being covered in the UK in time to pip the USA product at the p[ost when
it was eventually released here.

They really were "cover versions".

The modern habit of referring to any performance of someone else's song
as a "cover" is peculiar. The term specifically referred to
opportunistic release of rival recordings designed to steal sales from
an earlier version.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The Beatles had a policy of not issuing anything not group-composed on a
single. "Twist And Shout" was never going to be released on a single for
that reason.

The Brian Poole version (this was summer 1963) was pretty good, but
wasn't the first cover of a Beatles or Beatles-related song by a
well-known performer. Kenny Lynch was the first, with a version of
"Misery", followed soon after by Duffy Power with "I Saw Her Standing
There". Helen Shapiro had turned down Lennon/McCartney's offer of
"Misery", which might have been a mistake.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 17:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit
records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight
train fromn them,
That is true, but I'm sure the PP wasn't referring to Embassy Records'
versions getting into the charts (they never did), but to separate
well-established singers each recording the same popular song simply
because it was popular. TYhere was a sub-genre of hit American records
being covered in the UK in time to pip the USA product at the p[ost when
it was eventually released here.
They really were "cover versions".
The modern habit of referring to any performance of someone else's song
as a "cover" is peculiar. The term specifically referred to
opportunistic release of rival recordings designed to steal sales from
an earlier version.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The Beatles had a policy of not issuing anything not group-composed on a
single. "Twist And Shout" was never going to be released on a single for
that reason.
The Brian Poole version (this was summer 1963) was pretty good,
I preferred the Brian Poole version at the time, but I think that was because
it was somewhat less raucous than the Lennon On Lemsip version.

However; time, and an appreciation of the details of music recording has
changed my mind.
Post by JNugent
but
wasn't the first cover of a Beatles or Beatles-related song by a
well-known performer. Kenny Lynch was the first, with a version of
"Misery", followed soon after by Duffy Power with "I Saw Her Standing
There". Helen Shapiro had turned down Lennon/McCartney's offer of
"Misery", which might have been a mistake.
What has this to do with anything other than you trying to pretend you are an
expert, as usual?

We were talking about cover versions/originals which had reached number one
at a similar time to each other.
JNugent
2018-03-13 20:12:52 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit
records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight
train fromn them,
That is true, but I'm sure the PP wasn't referring to Embassy Records'
versions getting into the charts (they never did), but to separate
well-established singers each recording the same popular song simply
because it was popular. TYhere was a sub-genre of hit American records
being covered in the UK in time to pip the USA product at the p[ost when
it was eventually released here.
They really were "cover versions".
The modern habit of referring to any performance of someone else's song
as a "cover" is peculiar. The term specifically referred to
opportunistic release of rival recordings designed to steal sales from
an earlier version.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The Beatles had a policy of not issuing anything not group-composed on a
single. "Twist And Shout" was never going to be released on a single for
that reason.
The Brian Poole version (this was summer 1963) was pretty good,
I preferred the Brian Poole version at the time, but I think that was because
it was somewhat less raucous than the Lennon On Lemsip version.
However; time, and an appreciation of the details of music recording has
changed my mind.
Post by JNugent
but
wasn't the first cover of a Beatles or Beatles-related song by a
well-known performer. Kenny Lynch was the first, with a version of
"Misery", followed soon after by Duffy Power with "I Saw Her Standing
There". Helen Shapiro had turned down Lennon/McCartney's offer of
"Misery", which might have been a mistake.
What has this to do with anything other than you trying to pretend you are an
expert, as usual?
We were talking about cover versions/originals which had reached number one
at a similar time to each other.
Original and cover both hitting number one?

There are not many, if any, of those.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 08:50:36 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway)
that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one
within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
I in my childhood Woolworth's used to sell cheaper cover versions of hit
records on the Embasssy label. I remember buying Cumberland Gap and Freight
train fromn them,
That is true, but I'm sure the PP wasn't referring to Embassy Records'
versions getting into the charts (they never did), but to separate
well-established singers each recording the same popular song simply
because it was popular. TYhere was a sub-genre of hit American records
being covered in the UK in time to pip the USA product at the p[ost when
it was eventually released here.
They really were "cover versions".
The modern habit of referring to any performance of someone else's song
as a "cover" is peculiar. The term specifically referred to
opportunistic release of rival recordings designed to steal sales from
an earlier version.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the
Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The Beatles had a policy of not issuing anything not group-composed on a
single. "Twist And Shout" was never going to be released on a single for
that reason.
The Brian Poole version (this was summer 1963) was pretty good,
I preferred the Brian Poole version at the time, but I think that was because
it was somewhat less raucous than the Lennon On Lemsip version.
However; time, and an appreciation of the details of music recording has
changed my mind.
Post by JNugent
but
wasn't the first cover of a Beatles or Beatles-related song by a
well-known performer. Kenny Lynch was the first, with a version of
"Misery", followed soon after by Duffy Power with "I Saw Her Standing
There". Helen Shapiro had turned down Lennon/McCartney's offer of
"Misery", which might have been a mistake.
What has this to do with anything other than you trying to pretend you are an
expert, as usual?
We were talking about cover versions/originals which had reached number one
at a similar time to each other.
Original and cover both hitting number one?
There are not many, if any, of those.
There obviously is one, otherwise we would not be talking about it.

I thought you were the expert?
Incubus
2018-03-13 10:51:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor
were graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after
the magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother was
surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
It was a conspiracy :D
JNugent
2018-03-13 16:44:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
It happened a lot in the 1950s (and presumably in the 1940s too, in the
USA). It was because of the prevalence of live music, particularly by
palais bands, with "vocal refrain", but also on the BBC, with "hit
songs" performed by resident bands. For the average audience member, the
singer wasn't as important as the song.
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The same year, Los Indios Tabajaras had a big international hit with a
wonderful instrumental recording of the near-standard "Maria Elena".

UK singer Gary Miller cashed in with a quick vocal version. I remember
standing in a queue at a record shop just before Christmas 1963, with
the girl in front of me asking the assistant for "Marie Elena - but just
the tune".
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 17:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
It happened a lot in the 1950s (and presumably in the 1940s too, in the
USA). It was because of the prevalence of live music, particularly by
palais bands, with "vocal refrain", but also on the BBC, with "hit
songs" performed by resident bands. For the average audience member, the
singer wasn't as important as the song.
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The same year, Los Indios Tabajaras had a big international hit with a
wonderful instrumental recording of the near-standard "Maria Elena".
Yes, but I was referring to my memory of the charts.

As usual, any egotistical pedant can look up the pre-chart stuff on
Wikipedia.

I hope it made you feel superior.
JNugent
2018-03-13 20:11:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
It happened a lot in the 1950s (and presumably in the 1940s too, in the
USA). It was because of the prevalence of live music, particularly by
palais bands, with "vocal refrain", but also on the BBC, with "hit
songs" performed by resident bands. For the average audience member, the
singer wasn't as important as the song.
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The same year, Los Indios Tabajaras had a big international hit with a
wonderful instrumental recording of the near-standard "Maria Elena".
Yes, but I was referring to my memory of the charts.
As usual, any egotistical pedant can look up the pre-chart stuff on
Wikipedia.
I hope it made you feel superior.
Neither Wikipedia nor any other extraneous source was consulted.

This subject is one of my specialisms.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:22:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
All I know is that the Belgian doctor was smoking a cigar and my mother
was surrounded by nuns. From what my mother told me.
I looked at the chart archive, and it was quite strange (to me, anyway) that
two versions, by different artists, of the same song were number one within a
week or so of each other.
I don’t remember that happening very often.
It happened a lot in the 1950s (and presumably in the 1940s too, in the
USA). It was because of the prevalence of live music, particularly by
palais bands, with "vocal refrain", but also on the BBC, with "hit
songs" performed by resident bands. For the average audience member, the
singer wasn't as important as the song.
Post by johnny-knowall
I thought of Twist and Shout, but the Beatles version was an EP and the Brian
Poole one only reached number 4.
The same year, Los Indios Tabajaras had a big international hit with a
wonderful instrumental recording of the near-standard "Maria Elena".

UK singer Gary Miller cashed in with a quick vocal version. I remember
standing in a queue at a record shop just before Christmas 1963, with
the girl in front of me asking the assistant for "Marie Elena - but just
the tune".
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
==

My goodness! You two are really stirring memories:))
Tim
2018-03-13 10:00:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I'm guessing the first charts were c1952 with someone like Al Martino
topping them.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
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Phi
2018-03-13 10:03:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
I was dodging doodle-bugs in London.
m***@btopenworld.com
2018-03-13 14:54:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.

Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.

Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)

Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
saracene
2018-03-13 16:58:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.

MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
saracene
2018-03-13 17:03:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I first heard him on the 6 five special.

saracene
2018-03-13 17:05:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six-Five_Special
Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 18:01:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 18:15:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.

No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
JNugent
2018-03-13 20:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 08:52:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.

I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
saracene
2018-03-14 08:57:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought of that as an especially fatuous construction.
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I can agree wtih that. Their double white album was the best.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 09:27:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple
of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular
date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of
the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions
of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the
business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
Maybe, that is how it is with me.

Music, people, buildings.... I sometimes take an instant dislike to stuff,
but I can’t tell you why.
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I can agree wtih that. Their double white album was the best.
I agree with you there.
Incubus
2018-03-14 09:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.

Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
saracene
2018-03-14 10:04:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Incubus
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
YYou gave a much fuller explanation than saying "I don't know why I don't like it I just don't." But perhpas it's a bit too nigger for you in this day and age. I don't like slut rock. There are reasons but I'm not going into them now.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 11:13:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.

I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
Incubus
2018-03-14 12:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
Post by JNugent
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
unless they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors
for free public use where you could check what was top of the
charts for any particular date and play it. I was born too
early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable
than what you can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection
of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning!
Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to
argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to
be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell
above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at
one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at
the time, always said that had he known Steele had recorded
the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get
started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a
few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening
with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard
him on the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues
which I leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy
cover version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green
Door by Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four
records. Freight train must have been on the other side of
Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a
bit sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty
act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs
being very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable
these days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than
the Tommy Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red
feathers and a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title -
but I remember everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better
than than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always
thought of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or
have an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that
I dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot
stand Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms
and melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that effect
on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change or
melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect. I think the
emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created. Once you have enough
such memories, there are a number of associations that can aid in the recall.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 12:37:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
Post by JNugent
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC,
johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
unless they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British
library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors
for free public use where you could check what was top of the
charts for any particular date and play it. I was born too
early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable
than what you can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first
recollection
of music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record
hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete
Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and
was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to
it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning!
Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to
argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used
to
be neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell
above the Steele version although apparently Tommy was at
one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star
at
the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded
the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to
get
started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite
a
few times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening
with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard
him on the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues
which I leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy
cover version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green
Door by Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four
records. Freight train must have been on the other side of
Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a
bit sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty
act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs
being very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable
these days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than
the Tommy Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red
feathers and a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title -
but I remember everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better
than than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did
the
same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always
thought of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or
have an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that
I dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot
stand Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms
and melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that effect
on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change or
melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect. I think
the
emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created. Once you have enough
such memories, there are a number of associations that can aid in the
recall.

==

Yes, I guess it must be that. Some that I haven't heard in a while, can
move me deeply when I hear them:)
Joe
2018-03-14 13:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody

It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever) and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
--
Joe
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 14:09:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever)
I had the same attraction to Karen Carpenter’s voice, but ever since her
death I can’t really listen to her without thinking of all the bad stuff
she might have endured for years prior to her demise. I think the full horror
of her anorexia problems only came out after she had passed on.

Barbra Streisand is another person whose singing voice makes my hair stand on
end.
Post by Joe
and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
JNugent
2018-03-14 18:01:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever)
I had the same attraction to Karen Carpenter’s voice, but ever since her
death I can’t really listen to her without thinking of all the bad stuff
she might have endured for years prior to her demise. I think the full horror
of her anorexia problems only came out after she had passed on.
I saw The Carpenters live when they were on tour in the UK in early 1974.

I had seen them on TV when they were here previously (late 1971) and was
only otherwise familiar with their appearance from LP sleeve illustrations.

In 1974, when Karen walked out onto that stage, she looked like a
skeleton. There was an audible gasp from many in the audience. And this
was some nine years before the disease killed her.

On the early LP photos, Karen looked beautiful. Why she thought she
needed to lose weight is a mystery to me.
Post by johnny-knowall
Barbra Streisand is another person whose singing voice makes my hair stand on
end.
An acquired taste, I'd say.

Ever hear Maureen McGovern?
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 18:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever)
I had the same attraction to Karen Carpenter’s voice, but ever since her
death I can’t really listen to her without thinking of all the bad stuff
she might have endured for years prior to her demise. I think the full horror
of her anorexia problems only came out after she had passed on.
I saw The Carpenters live when they were on tour in the UK in early 1974.
I had seen them on TV when they were here previously (late 1971) and was
only otherwise familiar with their appearance from LP sleeve illustrations.
In 1974, when Karen walked out onto that stage, she looked like a
skeleton. There was an audible gasp from many in the audience. And this
was some nine years before the disease killed her.
On the early LP photos, Karen looked beautiful. Why she thought she
needed to lose weight is a mystery to me.
Post by johnny-knowall
Barbra Streisand is another person whose singing voice makes my hair stand on
end.
An acquired taste, I'd say.
Ever hear Maureen McGovern?
A long time ago, and I was a little the worse for wear IIRC. I liked the
singing but there was something about her accent which grated with me.
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Joe
and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 20:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
"Joe" wrote in message news:***@jresid.jretrading.com...

On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody

It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever) and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.

Joe
==

Oh! Just spotted this. I loved Jake Thackray:))
Farmer Giles
2018-03-14 20:32:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever) and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
Joe
==
Oh!  Just spotted this.  I loved Jake Thackray:))
Sadly not with us anymore. This is my favourite of his.


Joe
2018-03-14 20:41:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 20:32:20 +0000
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Joe
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever) and
prefer instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or
witty lyrics, such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
Joe
==
Oh!  Just spotted this.  I loved Jake Thackray:))
Sadly not with us anymore. This is my favourite of his.
http://youtu.be/FE-BKrAAZGc
One of the clean ones...
--
Joe
Ophelia
2018-03-14 20:41:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 12:19:40 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
On 14 Mar 2018, Incubus wrote (in article
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in
particular or have an aversion to something else? I can point out
aspects of a thing that I dislike but I cannot explain why I
dislike them. For example, I cannot stand Rap 'music'; I find it
repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and melodies
simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike
about Rap don't prevent me from liking other music that can also
be repetitive and simplistic and I have no issue listening to
songs that deal with even more extreme violence than can be found
in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When
it came to the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst
into tears. It wasn’t anything to do with the story, but just the
key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have
that effect on me, too.
I find that once I have an emotional response to a certain key change
or melody, something recognisably similar can have the same effect.
I think the emotional memory is recalled and a new memory created.
Once you have enough such memories, there are a number of
associations that can aid in the recall.
More fragments of the Ultimate Melody...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Melody
It's a bit odd that 'music' people seem to have self-assembled here,
as there's not that many of us. I'm another one, I've usually heard
voices as just another instrument (e.g. Karen Carpenter used to sing
absolute rubbish, but I could listen to her voice forever) and prefer
instrumentals. I'm generally interested only in funny or witty lyrics,
such as those of Jake Thackray or Clive James.
Joe
==
Oh! Just spotted this. I loved Jake Thackray:))
Sadly not with us anymore. This is my favourite of his.

http://youtu.be/FE-BKrAAZGc

==

Love it:))
Ophelia
2018-03-14 12:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC,
johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors
for
free public use where you could check what was top of the
charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first
recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete
Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many
of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used
to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell
above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time
No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time,
always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then
he
would not have done so because he appreciated how
difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite
a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening
with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard
him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland
Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came
to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.

I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.

==

Some tunes/melodies have a strong effect on me too.
JNugent
2018-03-14 17:54:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
I can remember the same sort of reaction (not tears, but a sort of
discomfort, because my expectations were being challenged) when I heard
The Shadows' "FBI". The seventh and eighth bars of the main melody use
the same phrase four times (half a bar each time) whilst the chords
shift underneath. I hadn't been interested in music all that much by
then, and this felt as though your emotions were being twisted.

I experienced the same thing, but more pronounced, when the bossa nova
craze a couple of years later brought up "One Note Samba", with its
not-quite-single note melody underscored by a constantly-shifting chord
sequence in a way which was still unfamiliar to me.

I have a recording of "Tubby". I must give it another listen.
saracene
2018-03-14 18:06:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
That is still more of an explanation thatn saying I don't knw why I liked it I just did.
Post by johnny-knowall
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
I liked this. I still do.



It is a very lively tune with bizarre lyrics. Varied instruments. Something hypnotic about it.
JNugent
2018-03-14 18:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[ .. ]
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
That is still more of an explanation thatn saying I don't knw why I liked it I just did.
Post by johnny-knowall
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
I liked this. I still do.
http://youtu.be/FAviGOqtAqM
It is a very lively tune with bizarre lyrics. Varied instruments. Something hypnotic about it.
Funny you should mention it.

I've had the record for years and had the same reaction to it.

But the melody is shown to better advantage as an instrumental (which is
how I think it must have been intended):



and



There is also a vocal version by Mel "Bugs Bunny" Blanc, which is where
I think the Edwards/Whitfield/Bentley version was sourced.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 18:31:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
Post by JNugent
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better
than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
That is still more of an explanation thatn saying I don't knw why I liked it I just did.
Post by johnny-knowall
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
I liked this. I still do.
http://youtu.be/FAviGOqtAqM
It is a very lively tune with bizarre lyrics. Varied instruments. Something
hypnotic about it.
Goodness me. I haven’t heard that for about 60 years. I remember that being
played on children’s favourites or some similar radio show I was permitted
to listen to.
saracene
2018-03-14 18:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
Post by JNugent
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:09 AM UTC, johnny-knowall
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts
for any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I
did it for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you
can get on line.
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray
That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was
broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb
my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1
with it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always
said that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he
would not have done so because he appreciated how difficult it
was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor
Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with
Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I
leant by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover
version though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by
Frankie Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records.
Freight train must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit
sick of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of
violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle
groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better
than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
"I don't know why I like [or dont like it] I just do". I have always
thought
of that as an especially fatuous construction.
How so? Who can explain exactly why they like something in particular or have
an aversion to something else? I can point out aspects of a thing that I
dislike but I cannot explain why I dislike them. For example, I cannot stand
Rap 'music'; I find it repetitive, the lyrics repugnant, the rythms and
melodies simplistic and I cannot stand the vocal delivery - yet I cannot
explain why those things bother me so much. The things I dislike about Rap
don't prevent me from liking other music that can also be repetitive and
simplistic and I have no issue listening to songs that deal with even more
extreme violence than can be found in a Rap 'song'.
Who can explain any of our emotional reactions to things?
When I was a small child I heard Tubby The Tuba on the radio. When it came to
the tune that Tubby gets taught to play, I just burst into tears. It wasn’t
anything to do with the story, but just the key changes in that song.
That is still more of an explanation thatn saying I don't knw why I liked it
I just did.
Post by johnny-knowall
I couldn’t explain it then, and I can’t now. Other melodies have that
effect on me, too.
I liked this. I still do.
http://youtu.be/FAviGOqtAqM
It is a very lively tune with bizarre lyrics. Varied instruments. Something
hypnotic about it.
Goodness me. I haven’t heard that for about 60 years. I remember that being
played on children’s favourites or some similar radio show I was permitted
to listen to.
Uncle Mac. "Hallo children, everywhere". People would be suspicious of him in these less inocent times.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:30:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the
business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by
heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.

I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.

==

I didn't like them when they started and never did learn to like them at
all.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 11:27:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on
the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio
lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many
of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known
Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the
business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by
heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must
have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
==
I didn't like them when they started and never did learn to like them at
all.
There seemed to be something of a Marmite effect with the Beatles. I know
quite a few people who think most of their music was rubbish, and can’t
understand why others went nuts for them.

I have been listening to a few skiffle songs on Youtube, in an effort to try
and pinpoint why I might have taken a dislike to them as a child. I can only
surmise that skiffle wasn’t tuneful enough for me. I rarely bothered
listening to the words of a song, and was really only interested in the
music.

I never liked country or folk music either, but loved 12-bar blues.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 12:33:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free
public
use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on
the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio
lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many
of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known
Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the
business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by
heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must
have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better
than
than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
==
I didn't like them when they started and never did learn to like them at
all.
There seemed to be something of a Marmite effect with the Beatles. I know
quite a few people who think most of their music was rubbish, and can’t
understand why others went nuts for them.

I have been listening to a few skiffle songs on Youtube, in an effort to try
and pinpoint why I might have taken a dislike to them as a child. I can only
surmise that skiffle wasn’t tuneful enough for me. I rarely bothered
listening to the words of a song, and was really only interested in the
music.

I never liked country or folk music either, but loved 12-bar blues.

==

My father loved them:) I came in one day and he told me about this great
group he had just seen on tv <g>

Country music? Oh yes, I love it:)) Skiffle? no:(
Incubus
2018-03-14 12:14:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for
any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it
for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on
line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That
began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on
11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket
over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was
going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school
listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the
records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with
it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said
that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not
have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a
young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version
though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie
Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train
must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
==
I didn't like them when they started and never did learn to like them at all.
There's no doubting they were very influential (although not necessarily as
much as they are given credit for) but they were never my cup of tea. That
might be because I was born in the wrong era as much as anything else. I think
there is something clown-like about them as a band and John Lennon in
particular came off as pretentious and sanctimonious. Ringo at least was down
to earth and made himself Really Useful as the narrator of Thomas the Tank
Engine, which is probably my favourite of his talents :)
Ophelia
2018-03-14 12:34:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 13 Mar 2018, JNugent wrote (in article
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for
any particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it
for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on
line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That
began apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on
11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket
over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was
going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school
listened also and we used to argue over the positions of the
records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be
neck and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with
it. Guy Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said
that had he known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not
have done so because he appreciated how difficult it was for a
young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version
though. I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie
Vaughan. For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train
must have been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles started
as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
==
I didn't like them when they started and never did learn to like them at all.
There's no doubting they were very influential (although not necessarily as
much as they are given credit for) but they were never my cup of tea. That
might be because I was born in the wrong era as much as anything else. I
think
there is something clown-like about them as a band and John Lennon in
particular came off as pretentious and sanctimonious. Ringo at least was
down
to earth and made himself Really Useful as the narrator of Thomas the Tank
Engine, which is probably my favourite of his talents :)
==

lol yes, Ringo was the most down to earth. Heh but you are still nobbut a
lad:)))
Ian Jackson
2018-03-14 15:39:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library
couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a
Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning!
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because
he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a
few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
Skiffle was responsible for thousands of us learning the rudiments of
music - and guitar playing in particular. To some, it was an
introduction to personal participation in the world of folk music, 'trad
jazz', rock and roll, and - for the really talented, to modern popular
music. Many went on to have very successful careers. Without skiffle, I
doubt if we'd have had the Beatles, Mark Knopfler - and countless more.

This one is particularly excruciating!

Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I have to admit that I thought the Beatles' first hit - Love Me Do - was
simply weird, and I didn't like it. However, the boys 'done good' - and
I've now relented, and not think that the old ones were generally the
best.
--
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 16:30:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library
couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free
public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a
Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning!
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because
he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a
few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard
him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train
must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a
bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
Skiffle was responsible for thousands of us learning the rudiments of
music - and guitar playing in particular.
I’m not saying skiffle was bad, just that I didn’t like it.
Post by Ian Jackson
To some, it was an
introduction to personal participation in the world of folk music, 'trad
jazz', rock and roll, and - for the really talented, to modern popular
music. Many went on to have very successful careers. Without skiffle, I
doubt if we'd have had the Beatles, Mark Knopfler - and countless more.
http://youtu.be/hx7U47sH1O4
This one is particularly excruciating!
http://youtu.be/rCptPcovTg4
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I have to admit that I thought the Beatles' first hit - Love Me Do - was
simply weird, and I didn't like it. However, the boys 'done good' - and
I've now relented, and not think that the old ones were generally the
best.
I didn’t mind Love Me Do, but it didn’t strike me as the start of
anything special at the time.

From Me To You I thought was weird with that sudden couple of falsetto notes
every now and then.

The next few singles I thought were passable, but it took me until I Feel
Fine to really like one of their releases.
saracene
2018-03-14 16:37:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by JNugent
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born,
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library
couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free
public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits
broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a
Sunday night.
I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning!
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the
Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because
he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a
few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard
him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train
must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a
bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on
skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
I don't think this is true for the Rolling Stones, but The Beatles
started as a skiffle group. Lots of other famous sixties acts did the same.
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
Skiffle was responsible for thousands of us learning the rudiments of
music - and guitar playing in particular.
I’m not saying skiffle was bad, just that I didn’t like it.
Post by Ian Jackson
To some, it was an
introduction to personal participation in the world of folk music, 'trad
jazz', rock and roll, and - for the really talented, to modern popular
music. Many went on to have very successful careers. Without skiffle, I
doubt if we'd have had the Beatles, Mark Knopfler - and countless more.
http://youtu.be/hx7U47sH1O4
This one is particularly excruciating!
http://youtu.be/rCptPcovTg4
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I have to admit that I thought the Beatles' first hit - Love Me Do - was
simply weird, and I didn't like it. However, the boys 'done good' - and
I've now relented, and not think that the old ones were generally the
best.
I didn’t mind Love Me Do, but it didn’t strike me as the start of
anything special at the time.
From Me To You I thought was weird with that sudden couple of falsetto notes
every now and then.
The next few singles I thought were passable, but it took me until I Feel
Fine to really like one of their releases.
For quite a while it ws little girls' music. My siser bought fanzines (is that what you called them?) about them. It was amusing when Lennon said they'd got more fans that Jesus ever had and the Ameircan fans started smashing their Beatles recorrds.
JNugent
2018-03-14 17:47:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[ ... ]
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by johnny-knowall
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
Skiffle was responsible for thousands of us learning the rudiments of
music - and guitar playing in particular. To some, it was an
introduction to personal participation in the world of folk music, 'trad
jazz', rock and roll, and - for the really talented, to modern popular
music. Many went on to have very successful careers. Without skiffle, I
doubt if we'd have had the Beatles, Mark Knopfler - and countless more.
http://youtu.be/hx7U47sH1O4
This one is particularly excruciating!
http://youtu.be/rCptPcovTg4
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I have to admit that I thought the Beatles' first hit - Love Me Do - was
simply weird, and I didn't like it. However, the boys 'done good' - and
I've now relented, and not think that the old ones were generally the best.
For the 11-yr-old me, LMD - or at least, the version with Ringo on drums
which appeared on the original 1962 single - conjured up an image of a
smoky dockside pub with jersey-clad ship's crew members on harmonica
(with a hint of concertina).

It was different and attractive enough to make me want to buy it with my
Christmas money, and I still have that red-label Parlophone single,
which was one of the first two records I ever bought (in one
transaction). The moment I heard the alternative version used on the
first LP (with Andy White on drums and Ringo on tambourine), I knew it
was a different recording.
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 18:23:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
[ ... ]
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by johnny-knowall
I hated skiffle groups. I don’t know why, I just did.
Skiffle was responsible for thousands of us learning the rudiments of
music - and guitar playing in particular. To some, it was an
introduction to personal participation in the world of folk music, 'trad
jazz', rock and roll, and - for the really talented, to modern popular
music. Many went on to have very successful careers. Without skiffle, I
doubt if we'd have had the Beatles, Mark Knopfler - and countless more.
http://youtu.be/hx7U47sH1O4
This one is particularly excruciating!
http://youtu.be/rCptPcovTg4
Post by johnny-knowall
I can’t say I thought much of early Beatles music either, but they improved
over time.
I have to admit that I thought the Beatles' first hit - Love Me Do - was
simply weird, and I didn't like it. However, the boys 'done good' - and
I've now relented, and not think that the old ones were generally the best.
For the 11-yr-old me, LMD - or at least, the version with Ringo on drums
which appeared on the original 1962 single - conjured up an image of a
smoky dockside pub with jersey-clad ship's crew members on harmonica
(with a hint of concertina).
It was different and attractive enough to make me want to buy it with my
Christmas money, and I still have that red-label Parlophone single,
Probably worth a few quid these days, if it is in good condition.
Post by JNugent
which was one of the first two records I ever bought (in one
transaction). The moment I heard the alternative version used on the
first LP (with Andy White on drums and Ringo on tambourine), I knew it
was a different recording.
Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 20:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.

I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
saracene
2018-03-13 20:31:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 20:33:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
Yes, that was the stuff. I'm sure that the walls of the dance hall used
to move with the sounds!
saracene
2018-03-13 20:38:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.


Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 20:44:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
And neither were these:




saracene
2018-03-13 21:18:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
http://youtu.be/4B7ypA1fSwU
http://youtu.be/EzgbcyfJgfQ
Joe Meek wws a memorable figure. He ws rumoured to be the Joe in Green Door.

"When they said Joe sent me someone laughed out loud behind the Green door".
Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 21:34:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
http://youtu.be/4B7ypA1fSwU
http://youtu.be/EzgbcyfJgfQ
Joe Meek wws a memorable figure. He ws rumoured to be the Joe in Green Door.
"When they said Joe sent me someone laughed out loud behind the Green door".
Can't say I've ever heard of him, wasn't that deeply into it, but did
Frankie Vaughan do that song?
saracene
2018-03-13 23:07:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
http://youtu.be/4B7ypA1fSwU
http://youtu.be/EzgbcyfJgfQ
Joe Meek wws a memorable figure. He ws rumoured to be the Joe in Green Door.
"When they said Joe sent me someone laughed out loud behind the Green door".
Can't say I've ever heard of him, wasn't that deeply into it, but did
Frankie Vaughan do that song?
Here he did. Teh rumour was flase actually, because the song was written by an American. YOu just brought up Testar though, which was one of Meeks greatest triumphs.

You really should inform yourself about Joe Meek.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Meek
saracene
2018-03-13 23:11:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
http://youtu.be/4B7ypA1fSwU
http://youtu.be/EzgbcyfJgfQ
Joe Meek wws a memorable figure. He ws rumoured to be the Joe in Green Door.
"When they said Joe sent me someone laughed out loud behind the Green door".
Can't say I've ever heard of him, wasn't that deeply into it, but did
Frankie Vaughan do that song?
Here he did. The rumour was false actually, because the song was written by an American. You just brought up Telstar though, which was one of Meek's greatest triumphs.
You really should inform yourself about Joe Meek.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Meek

Meek heard many up and coming bands and artists over his career, some of which he didn't see any potential for. After Brian Epstein asked his opinion of the Beatles' demo tape, Meek told him not to bother signing them. On another occasion he signed a band on the condition that they get rid of their lead singer: a 16-year-old Rod Stewart.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:48:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie
Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.
http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs
And neither were these:

http://youtu.be/4B7ypA1fSwU

http://youtu.be/EzgbcyfJgfQ

==

OH yes! I was a HUGE Shadows fan:)) Ahh memories ...
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:47:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2:54:52 PM UTC,
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie
Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
They were all yanks though. These weren't though.

http://youtu.be/dA4DiBbJdUs

==

Bonkers:)) I remember it well ...
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 08:54:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the
business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
There was some pretty decent stuff around pre-Beatles. I used to go to
the village 'hop' when I was about 15 (1961) and I remember pop music
being pretty lively at the time.
I don't remember there being any 'anti-elders generation' revolution.
In fact I remember the older and younger generations getting on a lot
better than now, with both being more tolerant of each others' taste in
music. Earlier to that there may have been some antipathy towards 'Teddy
Boys', but they were pretty tame compared to today's lot.
Early Elvis, little Ricahrd and Jerry Lee Lewis were really great. Eddie
Cochrane too. Just few off the top on my head.
I didn’t like any of them, so I can’t join in with this nostalgia-fest.
Incubus
2018-03-14 09:38:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get
started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show
seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though. I bought
Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan. For some years I
only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on the other
side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele version.
Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a hula-hula skirt' -
not sure if that was the title - but I remember everyone singing that at the
time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
But didn't the Beatles and a number of other bands of that era start out as a
skiffle group?
saracene
2018-03-14 09:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Incubus
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get
started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show
seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though. I bought
Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan. For some years I
only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on the other
side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele version.
Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a hula-hula skirt' -
not sure if that was the title - but I remember everyone singing that at the
time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
But didn't the Beatles and a number of other bands of that era start out as a
skiffle group?
For my one man skiffle band I made myself a drum kit out of old cake tins and used a piece of corrugated cardboard for a washboard. I used to sing hang down your head Tom Dooley.
Incubus
2018-03-14 09:59:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Incubus
On 13 Mar 2018, Farmer Giles wrote (in
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless
they counted sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple
of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public
use where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my
sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast
on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00
p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my
head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to
school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also
and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to
get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the 6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan. For
some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.
No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.
But didn't the Beatles and a number of other bands of that era start out as
a skiffle group?
For my one man skiffle band I made myself a drum kit out of old cake tins and
used a piece of corrugated cardboard for a washboard. I used to sing hang
down your head Tom Dooley.
I'm awfully sorry I missed that :D
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:29:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952
(sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I
listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I
disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many of the
kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the positions of
the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and
used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
I hated all that puerile shit. And don’t get me started on skiffle groups.

No wonder we youngsters found the Beatles, Stones, Who, etc.; as a
anti-elders generation revolution. They were a hundred times better than
than
the crappy stuff the jive generation put up with.

==

Elvis was one of my favourites:))
JNugent
2018-03-13 20:14:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple
of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public
use where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date and play it. I was born too  early but I did it for
my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a
Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my
bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the
next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used
to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to
get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the  6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
That is the exact title, word for word. It was one of the songs they
shpowed at the Saturday morning cinema we went to, with the lyrics
projected onto the screen for "community singing".
Farmer Giles
2018-03-13 20:34:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a
couple of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for
free public use where you could check what was top of the charts for
any particular date and play it. I was born too  early but I did it
for my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on
line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of
music charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast
on the fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began
apparently in 1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00
p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my
head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to
school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also
and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to
get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the  6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being
very popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these
days - his Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy
Steele version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and
a hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
That is the exact title, word for word. It was one of the songs they
shpowed at the Saturday morning cinema we went to, with the lyrics
projected onto the screen for "community singing".
Ha, happy days.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 10:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio
lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next morning! Many
of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue over the
positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6
five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been
on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.

==

Me too:))
Farmer Giles
2018-03-14 15:18:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple
of years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public
use where you could check what was top of the charts for any
particular date and play it. I was born too  early but I did it for
my sons. It was probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a
Sunday night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my
bedside radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the
next morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used
to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck
and neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele
version although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy
Mitchell, an established star at the time, always said that had he
known Steele had recorded the song, then he would not have done so
because he appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to
get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few
times in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle",
Fineans Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1
man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on
the  6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant
by heart and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick
of them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
Ophelia
2018-03-14 19:47:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!

==

Oh? How old did you think I was?
johnny-knowall
2018-03-14 19:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh? How old did you think I was?
(Light the blue touch paper, and stand well back)
Ophelia
2018-03-14 20:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they
counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh? How old did you think I was?
(Light the blue touch paper, and stand well back)

==

LOL
saracene
2018-03-14 19:59:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh? How old did you think I was?
You have a youthful spirit.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 20:06:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh? How old did you think I was?
You have a youthful spirit.

==

Thanks m'dear, so do you:))

Ok I will fess up:) I am well retired and a very happy Grandmother:))
Farmer Giles
2018-03-14 20:29:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too  early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh?  How old did you think I was?
I've never really thought about it, but I suppose I rather vaguely
imagined that you were fifty something.
Ophelia
2018-03-14 20:41:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh? How old did you think I was?
I've never really thought about it, but I suppose I rather vaguely
imagined that you were fifty something.
==

Well, now you know:))
Farmer Giles
2018-03-14 20:45:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use
where you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date
and play it. I was born too  early but I did it for my sons. It was
probably more reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music
charts were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the
fabled 208 m band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in
1952 (sounds about right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday
night. I listened to it with a blanket over my head and my bedside
radio lest I disturb my parents. I was going to school the next
morning! Many of the kids at school listened also and we used to argue
over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell,
an established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele
had recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he
appreciated how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in
the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times
in musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans
Rainbow, Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen
twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the
6 five speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart
and used to sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have
been on the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of
them. Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
I don't remember that, but I do remember Guy Mitchell's songs being very
popular in the 1950s. From memory - not always reliable these days - his
Singing the Blues was far more popular here than the Tommy Steele
version. Before that there was the 'She wears red feathers and a
hula-hula skirt' - not sure if that was the title - but I remember
everyone singing that at the time.
==
Me too:))
Gosh, Ophelia, you're older than I thought!
==
Oh?  How old did you think I was?
I've never really thought about it, but I suppose I rather vaguely
imagined that you were fifty something.
==
Well, now you know:))
I don't actually. Not nice to ask a lady her age - but, go on, give us a
clue? :-)

johnny-knowall
2018-03-13 17:36:06 UTC
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Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use where
you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date and play
it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more
reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts
were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m
band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about
right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents.
I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened
also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6 five
speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and used to
sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on
the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of them.
Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
As a child I could never understand “The Railroad Runs Through The Middle
Of The House”

I could never understand how people could cope with a train running through
their house.
saracene
2018-03-13 18:33:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by johnny-knowall
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
I think they did start in about 1952. At the British library a couple of
years ago they had a computer on one of the floors for free public use where
you could check what was top of the charts for any particular date and play
it. I was born too early but I did it for my sons. It was probably more
reliable than what you can get on line.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Well I don't know how old you are but my first recollection of music charts
were Radio Luxembourg's "Top 20" Record hits broadcast on the fabled 208 m
band. presented by Pete Murray That began apparently in 1952 (sounds about
right) and was broadcast on 11-00 p.m. on a Sunday night. I listened to it
with a blanket over my head and my bedside radio lest I disturb my parents.
I was going to school the next morning! Many of the kids at school listened
also and we used to argue over the positions of the records we heard.
Tommy Steele/ Guy Mitchell "Singing the Blues" AIRI used to be neck and
neck in the charts usually with the Mitchell above the Steele version
although apparently Tommy was at one time No 1 with it. Guy Mitchell, an
established star at the time, always said that had he known Steele had
recorded the song, then he would not have done so because he appreciated
how difficult it was for a young artiste to get started in the business.
Tommy actually went on for years. I saw him perform quite a few times in
musicals like "Singing' in the Rain" "Doctor Doolittle", Fineans Rainbow,
Half a Sixpence, An Evening with Tommy Steele (1 man show seen twice)
Another excellent and versatile entertainer.
He was ok. Also did some cheesy stuff though. I first heard him on the 6 five
speical. Ah yes I bought singing the blues which I leant by heart and used to
sing. I bought the Embassy cover version though.
I bought Hound Dog by Elvis and Green Door by Frankie Vaughan.
For some years I only possesed four records. Freight train must have been on
the other side of Cumberland Gap.
MY parents had a complete set of Oklahoma songs, so I got a bit sick of them.
Wasn't Guy Mitchell jailed for some nasty act of violence?
As a child I could never understand “The Railroad Runs Through The Middle
Of The House”
I could never understand how people could cope with a train running through
their house.
It ended "I'm singing this song in the middle of the house" then you hear the train coming and presumably he gets killed.
JNugent
2018-03-13 16:38:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
Presumably, the midwife could not go into that much detail at the time?
I don’t think there were music charts when I was born, unless they counted
sales of sheet music.
November 1952 in the New Musical Express. Al Martino had the first
number one position. I think the record might have been "Here In My Heart".

<http://www.uk-charts.top-source.info/uk-chart-history.shtml>
Post by johnny-knowall
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
I'd be surprised if it were that way round.
saracene
2018-03-13 10:00:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
It's easy to look it up. There are websites to enable this.
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
https://join.worldcommunitygrid.org?recruiterId=123388
Tim
2018-03-13 10:20:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018 09:00:00 +0000
Post by Tim
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last
night. I just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I
know though that he was a very popular comedian.
You come across as rather younger than most of us here. Our generation
didn't laugh at swear words, or politicians being wished dead, nor were
graphic sex and violence available pretty much any night after the
magic 9PM.
Judging by the information in some posts I'm younger than a few here.
However I'm no spring chicken. I'm not sure whether it was Guy
Mitchell's or Tommy Steele's version of 'Singing the blues' that was
number one when I was born :)
It's easy to look it up. There are websites to enable this.
Apart from one site that said Tommy Steele others said Guy Mitchell. I
think Guy Mitchell was at the fag end of his chart career by then.
Post by saracene
Post by Tim
Post by Joe
On the other hand, most old comedy couldn't be broadcast now. Someone
older than I am has complained to me that there are no forbidden swear
words now, but I pointed out to him there is, they're just not the same
ones. 'Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells' pales into insignificance beside an
offended snowflake or feminist.
I'm surprised that today's media people could find enough Dodd material
to make up a programme, I'd be willing to bet that there were cuts.
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
https://join.worldcommunitygrid.org?recruiterId=123388
--
Please support mental health research and world community grid
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/
https://join.worldcommunitygrid.org?recruiterId=123388
abelard
2018-03-13 10:41:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tim
Post by JNugent
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular
comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after
six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their
business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself
had composed), ventriloquists  funny without being offensive. He
entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never
offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit!
when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like
him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
Too true.
I saw him once (in pantomime) in Liverpool (internet archives suggest
that this must have been his playing Buttons in Cinderella at the Empire
in 1956).
We saw him live just once more, at Southend a few years ago - the show
lasted from 19:30 to about 01:15.
Utterly brilliant. It was sad news in today's early hours.
I watched something like 'An audience with Ken Dodd' on tv last night. I
just couldn't get why the audience were laughing so much. I know though
that he was a very popular comedian.
they laughed because they liked him!

the laughed because he cheered them up...

not because he was funny or amusing
--
www.abelard.org
m***@btopenworld.com
2018-03-13 09:11:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JNugent
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself had composed), ventriloquists funny without being offensive. He entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit! when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
Too true.
I saw him once (in pantomime) in Liverpool (internet archives suggest
that this must have been his playing Buttons in Cinderella at the Empire
in 1956).
We saw him live just once more, at Southend a few years ago - the show
lasted from 19:30 to about 01:15.
Utterly brilliant. It was sad news in today's early hours.
We saw him in a small village country club where my then student son waited on table. He had some resemblance then to Freddie Starr. Doddy pulled him into his act (complete with drinks tray) as "Freddie".

The show was hilarious and he put all his talents on show, He fooled about, told gags, sang, performed a ventriloquist act

Afterwards we went round the back to introduce ourselves as "Freddies parents" Doddy was delighted to see us and shook us both warmly by the hand. He complimented our son "He wasn't phased a scrap", he commented,"Most kids of his age would have run a mile. He played up to me" "Cheeky little bugger!" My wife still has somewhere a photo he gave us signed "To Eve "Freddies Mum" so pleased to have met you Ken Dodd"
saracene
2018-03-13 09:34:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself had composed), ventriloquists funny without being offensive. He entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit! when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
First time I saw him was watching with my parents Sunday Night at the London Palladium when he seem new and unknown. We thought him exceptionaly goood and very funny.
I wasn't too keen on his schmaltzy songe.
He studied comedy seriously and intellectually. It was partly because of him that I read Freud's Jokes and thier relation to the Unconscicous. The theory was intersti8ng but the jokes cited were not very funny.
saracene
2018-03-13 09:39:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by saracene
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Just heard on this morning's breakfast that he has died aged 90.
"Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.
The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection."
Probably the last of the genuine stand up comedian who learned their business 'in the halls'
Talented, versatile (he could also put over a song which he himself had composed), ventriloquists funny without being offensive. He entertained people by engaging in pure fun. Never controversial, never offensive or seeking to embarrass.
I'll never forget my evening with Ken Dodd but he did go on a bit! when I got to meet him for 10 minutes or so. A charming fellow.
He will be sadly missed. The phrase "there will never be another like him" tends to be somewhat hackneyed and overused.
In this case it is true.
First time I saw him was watching with my parents Sunday Night at the London Palladium when he seem new and unknown. We thought him exceptionaly goood and very funny.
I wasn't too keen on his schmaltzy songe.
He studied comedy seriously and intellectually. It was partly because of him that I read Freud's Jokes and thier relation to the Unconscicous. The theory was intersti8ng but the jokes cited were not very funny.
One of Dodd's quips from 1967 at the time of devaluation Dodd was imagiging a British prime minister in the not too distant future talking about "the rupee in your pocket".
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