Discussion:
OT: How does valve work in a pump-up football?
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MM
2019-11-30 16:45:01 UTC
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I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?

MM
Keema's Nan
2019-11-30 17:35:52 UTC
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Post by MM
I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?
MM
I have always assumed it is a valve operating from the inside; and the higher
their pressure within the ball, the more tightly shut the valve becomes.

Is that too complex?
Dan S. MacAbre
2019-11-30 18:56:49 UTC
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Post by MM
I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?
MM
As far as I remember, it was a bit of tubing that collapsed like a flat
balloon (but not so flimsy) once you'd taken the pipe out. You can push
the pipe in, and inflate; but once it's withdrawn, the tube collapses,
and the pressure keeps it flattened.

A little bit like a biscupid heart valve, I'd suggest.
Joe
2019-11-30 19:21:12 UTC
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 18:56:49 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by MM
I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?
MM
As far as I remember, it was a bit of tubing that collapsed like a
flat balloon (but not so flimsy) once you'd taken the pipe out. You
can push the pipe in, and inflate; but once it's withdrawn, the tube
collapses, and the pressure keeps it flattened.
A little bit like a biscupid heart valve, I'd suggest.
These days it's likely to be a fairly solid tube with the hole bored
part of the way along, then a longitudinal cut for the rest of the way.
The needle pushes the cut halves apart.
--
Joe
Ian Jackson
2019-11-30 21:41:15 UTC
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Post by Joe
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 18:56:49 +0000
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by MM
I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?
MM
As far as I remember, it was a bit of tubing that collapsed like a
flat balloon (but not so flimsy) once you'd taken the pipe out. You
can push the pipe in, and inflate; but once it's withdrawn, the tube
collapses, and the pressure keeps it flattened.
A little bit like a biscupid heart valve, I'd suggest.
These days it's likely to be a fairly solid tube with the hole bored
part of the way along, then a longitudinal cut for the rest of the way.
The needle pushes the cut halves apart.
When I was around 5, I recall having a rubber beachball like that - with
a 'valve' that was little more that a small slit in the side. The
wall/skin of the ball continued a little way in through the slit, and
when inflated, the internal pressure held the slit tightly closed. I
remember having to make sure that the slit was always totally free of
sand, otherwise it leaked.
--
Ian
MM
2019-12-02 18:35:49 UTC
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Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by MM
I pumped up my first football ever by inserting the supplied needle
and using a pump. What I'd like to know is, what kind of valve is in
there to keep the air in once the needle is withdrawn?
MM
As far as I remember, it was a bit of tubing that collapsed like a flat
balloon (but not so flimsy) once you'd taken the pipe out. You can push
the pipe in, and inflate; but once it's withdrawn, the tube collapses,
and the pressure keeps it flattened.
A little bit like a biscupid heart valve, I'd suggest.
Ah, that makes more sense, thanks!

MM

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