Discussion:
Freedom now, for some.
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Mark, Devon
2020-07-04 09:46:58 UTC
Permalink
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some institution.
Keema's Nan
2020-07-04 10:13:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark, Devon
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the
shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being
still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some institution.
Given the tedious rituals everyone has to go through just to order a drink in
a pub, or food in a restaurant, I think those who are locked in are better
off by being spared all the super Saturday nonsense.

Certainly the cancer sufferers we know, who have been isolating since early
March, seem to have become used to the routine and have no wish to join the
*me first* rat race that easing of lockdown has produced.
Dan S. MacAbre
2020-07-04 10:49:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Mark, Devon
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the
shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being
still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some institution.
Given the tedious rituals everyone has to go through just to order a drink in
a pub, or food in a restaurant, I think those who are locked in are better
off by being spared all the super Saturday nonsense.
Certainly the cancer sufferers we know, who have been isolating since early
March, seem to have become used to the routine and have no wish to join the
*me first* rat race that easing of lockdown has produced.
We're booked for Sunday 12th lunch at a nearby pub - something I've
sorely missed, as a nice woodland walk with a roast dinner (and a few
pints) at the end of it was a bit of a ritual for us. It'll be
interesting to see how it goes.
Keema's Nan
2020-07-04 11:33:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Mark, Devon
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the
shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being
still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some institution.
Given the tedious rituals everyone has to go through just to order a drink in
a pub, or food in a restaurant, I think those who are locked in are better
off by being spared all the super Saturday nonsense.
Certainly the cancer sufferers we know, who have been isolating since early
March, seem to have become used to the routine and have no wish to join the
*me first* rat race that easing of lockdown has produced.
We're booked for Sunday 12th lunch at a nearby pub - something I've
sorely missed, as a nice woodland walk with a roast dinner (and a few
pints) at the end of it was a bit of a ritual for us. It'll be
interesting to see how it goes.
A lot of people I have talked to, have said that they have now adapted to the
less gregarious lifestyle. Mind you, they do tend to be in their 60s and 70s
and are very concerned that catching the virus might lead to a rather
dramatic but swift death for them.

This seems to be the problem which a lot of younger people do not appreciate
fully. Old age comes with various ailments and a diminishing immunity to
severe infections and the like.

I think they, and myself to a great extent, have decided that continued
living in a restricted sense is better than pegging it earlier than they
would like.
Dan S. MacAbre
2020-07-04 12:02:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Mark, Devon
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the
shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being
still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some institution.
Given the tedious rituals everyone has to go through just to order a drink in
a pub, or food in a restaurant, I think those who are locked in are better
off by being spared all the super Saturday nonsense.
Certainly the cancer sufferers we know, who have been isolating since early
March, seem to have become used to the routine and have no wish to join the
*me first* rat race that easing of lockdown has produced.
We're booked for Sunday 12th lunch at a nearby pub - something I've
sorely missed, as a nice woodland walk with a roast dinner (and a few
pints) at the end of it was a bit of a ritual for us. It'll be
interesting to see how it goes.
A lot of people I have talked to, have said that they have now adapted to the
less gregarious lifestyle. Mind you, they do tend to be in their 60s and 70s
and are very concerned that catching the virus might lead to a rather
dramatic but swift death for them.
I've never been gregarious - quite the opposite, in fact. This lockdown
has suited me perfectly. Our pub is a nice, quiet one. :-)
Post by Keema's Nan
This seems to be the problem which a lot of younger people do not appreciate
fully. Old age comes with various ailments and a diminishing immunity to
severe infections and the like.
Young people now seem to be overstimulated. They seem to be unable to
relax without constantly checking their 'phones. The BBC keep featuring
articles about how much they are 'suffering'. You'd think they were
unable to read, or something. Of course, if you keep telling someone
they are suffering, they will soon enough feel like they are.

That's one of the reasons I hate the BBC - they are always creating
division and discord, presumably for political reasons.
Post by Keema's Nan
I think they, and myself to a great extent, have decided that continued
living in a restricted sense is better than pegging it earlier than they
would like.
Keema's Nan
2020-07-04 12:28:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Mark, Devon
As most of England's lockdown measures are eased and people return to the
shops and pubs, spare a thought for those who are unable to, due to being
still effetively 'locked in', either in their own homes or some
institution.
Given the tedious rituals everyone has to go through just to order a drink in
a pub, or food in a restaurant, I think those who are locked in are better
off by being spared all the super Saturday nonsense.
Certainly the cancer sufferers we know, who have been isolating since early
March, seem to have become used to the routine and have no wish to join the
*me first* rat race that easing of lockdown has produced.
We're booked for Sunday 12th lunch at a nearby pub - something I've
sorely missed, as a nice woodland walk with a roast dinner (and a few
pints) at the end of it was a bit of a ritual for us. It'll be
interesting to see how it goes.
A lot of people I have talked to, have said that they have now adapted to the
less gregarious lifestyle. Mind you, they do tend to be in their 60s and 70s
and are very concerned that catching the virus might lead to a rather
dramatic but swift death for them.
I've never been gregarious - quite the opposite, in fact. This lockdown
has suited me perfectly. Our pub is a nice, quiet one. :-)
You are lucky. Our local pubs are loud and noisy affairs populated mainly by
those aged 20-45. They make me feel very old.
Post by Keema's Nan
This seems to be the problem which a lot of younger people do not appreciate
fully. Old age comes with various ailments and a diminishing immunity to
severe infections and the like.
Young people now seem to be overstimulated. They seem to be unable to
relax without constantly checking their 'phones. The BBC keep featuring
articles about how much they are 'suffering'. You'd think they were
unable to read, or something. Of course, if you keep telling someone
they are suffering, they will soon enough feel like they are.
That's one of the reasons I hate the BBC - they are always creating
division and discord, presumably for political reasons.
I haven’t watched BBC News for years, but ITV is no better - in fact for
highlighting news stories which include people sobbing because they haven’t
seen their grandchild for 3 months, or equivalent tosh, ITV gets the prize.

I know a few people who haven’t seen their grandchildren in a decade;
because they are in living in Australia.

That’s life for many people.

The few times I do watch a BBC programme, I like to count how many minutes
the director can go without including footage of a dog.

If they get beyond 5 it is a miracle.
Post by Keema's Nan
I think they, and myself to a great extent, have decided that continued
living in a restricted sense is better than pegging it earlier than they
would like.
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