Discussion:
Resignation Vs Election
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Roger
2019-09-03 08:52:21 UTC
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Permalink
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and the EU actually delivered, then it would only seem rational for Boris to stand down seeing as he aceeded to the position on his mandate of delivering a Brexit on Oct 31st.

Why does everybody interpret that as leading to a general election?

AFAIK the PM cannot call an election, it requires a 2/3 majority vote of parliament to do that; otherwise the onus is on parliament to appoint a new PM, who would inherit the responsibility of blocking Brexit.

Is there something I'm missing here?
Keema's Nan
2019-09-03 09:03:03 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roger
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and
the EU actually delivered,
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?

No.

So why would we want yet another extension where nothing happens?

Remainers are like kids queuing up for a vaccination against certain diseases
- they will think of everything they can in order to put off the inevitable.
Post by Roger
then it would only seem rational for Boris to
stand down seeing as he aceeded to the position on his mandate of delivering
a Brexit on Oct 31st.
Why does everybody interpret that as leading to a general election?
AFAIK the PM cannot call an election, it requires a 2/3 majority vote of
parliament to do that;
Or a vote of no confidence, and Boris will interpret the blocking of
“no-deal” as a vote of no confidence in him, because he has insisted that
we will definitely leave without a deal on Oct 31st if he is PM.
Post by Roger
otherwise the onus is on parliament to appoint a new
PM, who would inherit the responsibility of blocking Brexit.
Is there something I'm missing here?
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Roger
2019-09-03 09:19:44 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.

Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.

As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-03 14:33:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
abelard
2019-09-03 14:37:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
trust their actions...not their words!
--
www.abelard.org
MM
2019-09-03 23:11:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.

MM
Roger
2019-09-04 05:49:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are unlikely to be achieved :D

https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-intention-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-

That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con majority without the DUP.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 07:18:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
Or the fact that if there were to be an election, Corbyn would have to come
out and say exactly what his party was standing in the election for - not
just what they are against; which so far appears to be against everything
anyone suggests.

How would Corbyn react to being invited to a live TV debate where he can be
cross examined on Labour’s policies by Boris, knowing full well that the
Labour Party is even more divided than the Tories, and he is even more hated
by Blairites than Boris is by Tory 'wets'?

The whole thing would be a shambles, and yet we are paying for them to be
like this.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Roger
2019-09-04 07:27:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
He could always dodge the issue by saying they will hold a referendum.

In the referendum campaign he could sit on the fence and say they will respect the people's decision.

Irispective of the outcome there will still be no definitive action, but all vote options will have been exhausted.

And then?
abelard
2019-09-05 06:32:01 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roger
He could always dodge the issue by saying they will hold a referendum.
In the referendum campaign he could sit on the fence and say they will respect the people's decision.
didn't they say they'd 'respect' it last time around?

ever since, they've been blocking it

fortunately they can be trusted this time around
Post by Roger
Irispective of the outcome there will still be no definitive action, but all vote options will have been exhausted.
And then?
--
www.abelard.org
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 07:49:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.

Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.

Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
Roger
2019-09-04 08:24:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Unless of course there was a lib lab pact.

Last time that happened it led to 12 years of Thatcher.

But....you never no. It was only a few years ago that the lib SMS where demanding a referendum on the Lisbon treaty because it infringed on UK sovereignty :D
MM
2019-09-04 09:54:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.

MM
Ian Jackson
2019-09-04 12:14:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
but instead of BJ winning the struggle, this is being achieved by Corbyn
losing it. As has been oft-suggested, as a not-so-closet leaver he might
not be all that disappointed in his failure.
--
Ian
Roger
2019-09-04 15:06:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
but instead of BJ winning the struggle, this is being achieved by Corbyn
losing it. As has been oft-suggested, as a not-so-closet leaver he might
not be all that disappointed in his failure.
--
Ian
Corbyn is a 'no global' type of leaver whilst Boris is a libertarian so they don't exactly have the same idea of a post Brexit UK :D

Mind you, without the shackles of the EU it is much quicker and easier to change policies, so probably quicker to start by leaving in any scenario :D
Stephen Cole
2019-09-04 15:54:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass, and then be rushed through to the
statute books by early next week, so no deal will become illegal (at least
until end of January next year but the roll of the dice is that the
imminent election will mix things up well enough that something sensible
can finally be done with this dire shitshow).

With regards to polling figures, kindly do try and remember the absolute
state of Labour’s numbers right up until 10pm on polling day when it was
shortly thereafter revealed that they’d more or less tied with the Tories.
In other words; don’t believe their lies.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 16:23:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that
are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.

The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.

I’m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Post by Stephen Cole
and then be rushed through to the
statute books by early next week, so no deal will become illegal (at least
until end of January next year but the roll of the dice is that the
imminent election will mix things up well enough that something sensible
can finally be done with this dire shitshow).
With regards to polling figures, kindly do try and remember the absolute
state of Labour’s numbers right up until 10pm on polling day when it was
shortly thereafter revealed that they’d more or less tied with the Tories.
In other words; don’t believe their lies.
Pamela
2019-09-05 06:33:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 4 Sep 2019, Stephen Cole wrote (in article
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
On 4 Sep 2019, Roger wrote (in
Post by Roger
SNIP
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would
restore a con majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats,
and then be 100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and
there would have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's
trickery today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I'm afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
I'm afraid it's you who has counted his chickens far too early.

The Lords are not going to filibuster the Bill and were never expected to.

Brexiteers often have unrealistic expectations.
Roger
2019-09-05 06:52:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Brexiteers often have unrealistic expectations.
Oh yes. Some of them expected parliament to respect the vote of a referendum.

If parliament is not capable of applying Article 50 after nearly 3 years then either

a) Parliament is Incompetent (irrespective of the balance of power within).

b) Article 50 is not actually inkokable in a real world scenario and therefore the EU is a de facto United States of Europe.

But I don't think we can actually make any claims either way until the Fat Lady Sings.
Brian Gaff
2019-09-05 07:13:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You believe the polls? Ho ho, most people lie.
Brian
--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
***@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
(in
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
(in
On Tuesday, September 3, 2019 at 11:03:04 AM UTC+2, Keema's
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo
strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in
the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in
his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general
election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to
stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords.
Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that
are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and
then
be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I'm afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Post by Stephen Cole
and then be rushed through to the
statute books by early next week, so no deal will become illegal (at least
until end of January next year but the roll of the dice is that the
imminent election will mix things up well enough that something sensible
can finally be done with this dire shitshow).
With regards to polling figures, kindly do try and remember the absolute
state of Labour's numbers right up until 10pm on polling day when it was
shortly thereafter revealed that they'd more or less tied with the
Tories.
In other words; don't believe their lies.
Stephen Cole
2019-09-05 08:52:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I’m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Steve is just attention seeking.
If he was so confident, he won't need to make up all these fantasies.
Boris has got this all planned out - he's cut off every one of Corbyn's
options. True, the one Corbyn is currently going for is going to be the
most controversial but Boris has a plan for it which was been used before.
He hasn't cut any of Corbyn's options! It is *Boris* who is the lame
duck now, as Parliament trashes his attempt to get a general election
after the Tories in the House of Lords abandoned their planned
filibuster earlier today.
The Bill will become law on Monday.
Every single prediction Brian has made over the last 3 years has quickly
been proven to be massively wrong. He’s got absolutely atrocious political
instincts.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Rambo
2019-09-05 19:19:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 5 Sep 2019 08:52:46 GMT, Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that
are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I?m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Steve is just attention seeking.
If he was so confident, he won't need to make up all these fantasies.
Boris has got this all planned out - he's cut off every one of Corbyn's
options. True, the one Corbyn is currently going for is going to be the
most controversial but Boris has a plan for it which was been used before.
He hasn't cut any of Corbyn's options! It is *Boris* who is the lame
duck now, as Parliament trashes his attempt to get a general election
after the Tories in the House of Lords abandoned their planned
filibuster earlier today.
The Bill will become law on Monday.
Every single prediction Brian has made over the last 3 years has quickly
been proven to be massively wrong. He’s got absolutely atrocious political
instincts.
Would you expect anything less from the Basingtoke Gazette's political
correspondant?
Pamela
2019-09-05 19:24:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rambo
On 5 Sep 2019 08:52:46 GMT, Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
(in
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
(in
article<b98e38e2-eb52-41a6-8259-a439a7fc2187
@googlegroups.com>
Post by Rambo
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tuesday, September 3, 2019 at 11:03:04 AM UTC+2, Keema's
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the
case that parliament forces the PM to request an extension,
hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election
(which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to
stick to the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why
Corbyn demanded tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to
the Bill that will have been passed by the House of Commons
AND the House of Lords. Only after the RA is fact would Labour
consider giving in to Boris's election wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with
10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing
conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-
reports/2019/09/03
Post by Rambo
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
/votin g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would
restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and
there would have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's
trickery today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal
Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated
this afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I?m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Steve is just attention seeking.
If he was so confident, he won't need to make up all these fantasies.
Boris has got this all planned out - he's cut off every one of
Corbyn's options. True, the one Corbyn is currently going for is
going to be the most controversial but Boris has a plan for it which
was been used before.
He hasn't cut any of Corbyn's options! It is *Boris* who is the lame
duck now, as Parliament trashes his attempt to get a general election
after the Tories in the House of Lords abandoned their planned
filibuster earlier today.
The Bill will become law on Monday.
Every single prediction Brian has made over the last 3 years has quickly
been proven to be massively wrong. He’s got absolutely atrocious
political instincts.
Would you expect anything less from the Basingtoke Gazette's political
correspondant?
last time I saw Basingstoke it was like a giant housing estate with too
many roundabouts and dual carriageways. Sorry to be such a snob but the
better class of people who work there live in Winchester or somewhere
similar nearby but never in Basingstoke proper.
Marland
2019-09-06 20:22:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Rambo
Post by Stephen Cole
Every single prediction Brian has made over the last 3 years has quickly
been proven to be massively wrong. He’s got absolutely atrocious
political instincts.
Would you expect anything less from the Basingtoke Gazette's political
correspondant?
last time I saw Basingstoke it was like a giant housing estate with too
many roundabouts and dual carriageways. Sorry to be such a snob but the
better class of people who work there live in Winchester or somewhere
similar nearby but never in Basingstoke proper.
It was a reasonably ordinary Hampshire town till it was unfortunately
chosen to be a London overspill location and the dross from East London
Council estates sent there approximately 55 years ago which swamped it
,given the propensity of such people to replicate themselves amongst the
same circle of acquaintances as they reach 14 we are nearly on the the 4th
wave of inbreds .
At least Andover which suffered a similar fate had the squaddies from the
camps on Salisbury plain visiting on a night out to provide some different
genes when they inseminated the underage schoolgirls though the result has
lead to quite a few illegitimate thugs over the years.


GH
Pamela
2019-09-07 09:32:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Pamela
Post by Rambo
Post by Stephen Cole
Every single prediction Brian has made over the last 3 years has quickly
been proven to be massively wrong. He’s got absolutely atrocious
political instincts.
Would you expect anything less from the Basingtoke Gazette's political
correspondant?
last time I saw Basingstoke it was like a giant housing estate with too
many roundabouts and dual carriageways. Sorry to be such a snob but the
better class of people who work there live in Winchester or somewhere
similar nearby but never in Basingstoke proper.
It was a reasonably ordinary Hampshire town till it was unfortunately
chosen to be a London overspill location and the dross from East London
Council estates sent there approximately 55 years ago which swamped it
,given the propensity of such people to replicate themselves amongst the
same circle of acquaintances as they reach 14 we are nearly on the the 4th
wave of inbreds .
At least Andover which suffered a similar fate had the squaddies from the
camps on Salisbury plain visiting on a night out to provide some different
genes when they inseminated the underage schoolgirls though the result has
lead to quite a few illegitimate thugs over the years.
GH
I hadn't realise there was an influx of residents from East London to
basingstoke. I knew a friend who lived on the charmless Deepdene Estate and
it always seemed very characterless and with more chavs than normal. Best
thing about Basingstoke are the fast roads out of it.

Seems Brian Reay also has some sort of connection with the town.
Marland
2019-09-07 12:47:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Marland
Post by Pamela
last time I saw Basingstoke it was like a giant housing estate with too
many roundabouts and dual carriageways. Sorry to be such a snob but the
better class of people who work there live in Winchester or somewhere
similar nearby but never in Basingstoke proper.
It was a reasonably ordinary Hampshire town till it was unfortunately
chosen to be a London overspill location and the dross from East London
Council estates sent there approximately 55 years ago which swamped it
,given the propensity of such people to replicate themselves amongst the
same circle of acquaintances as they reach 14 we are nearly on the the 4th
wave of inbreds .
I hadn't realise there was an influx of residents from East London to
basingstoke. I knew a friend who lived on the charmless Deepdene Estate and
it always seemed very characterless and with more chavs than normal. Best
thing about Basingstoke are the fast roads out of it.
To be fair it is probably getting better nowadays compared to about 30
years ago when I went there for work purposes a couple of times a week.

Hampshire CC located their milestone museum there which is a collection of
artefacts and displays from the counties industrial and social past , it
is no Beamish or Blackcountry Museum but is a good effort nevertheless.
https://www.milestonesmuseum.org.uk

Basing house on the outskirts is pleasant enough to visit if you like old
buildings and gardens.
https://www.hampshireculture.org.uk/basing-house

GH
MM
2019-09-05 09:02:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 17:23:03 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy;
as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that
are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I’m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
I've already just posted in the other group that events have overtaken
you.

MM
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-07 12:30:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I‘m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Tee-hee. Yet another Brexiteer's crystal ball shatters.
--
*I speak fluent patriarchy but it's not my mother tongue

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Norman Wells
2019-09-07 16:12:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
I‘m afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Tee-hee. Yet another Brexiteer's crystal ball shatters.
Prophecy is so easy with hindsight, isn't it?

But it's not a lot of use.
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-08 11:58:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Stephen Cole
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass,
Only in the Commons.
The Lords are already well into filibustering so that the necessary
legislation will run out of time.
Im afraid you have counted your chickens far too early.
Tee-hee. Yet another Brexiteer's crystal ball shatters.
Prophecy is so easy with hindsight, isn't it?
But it's not a lot of use.
Prophecy based on a crystal ball - the Brexiteer standard - never is.
--
*I got a job at a bakery because I kneaded dough.*

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Rod Speed
2019-09-04 20:09:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
What on Earth makes you think that? The legislation being debated this
afternoon is almost certain to pass, and then be rushed through to the
statute books by early next week, so no deal will become illegal
But its not possible for any UK legislation to override the
provisions of Article 50 that it’s a no deal brexit without
parliament accepting what the EU offers.

The only UK legislation that can do that is revoking Article 50 and
there is no evidence that the current parliament will do that this week.
Post by Stephen Cole
(at least until end of January next year but the roll of the dice is that
the imminent election will mix things up well enough that something
sensible can finally be done with this dire shitshow).
Its far from clear that there will be a general election before an automatic
Article 50 no deal brexit.
Post by Stephen Cole
With regards to polling figures, kindly do try and remember the absolute
state of Labour’s numbers right up until 10pm on polling day when it was
shortly thereafter revealed that they’d more or less tied with the Tories.
In other words; don’t believe their lies.
Not lies so much as difficult to poll accurately.
MM
2019-09-05 09:00:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Sep 2019 13:14:39 +0100, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by MM
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 08:49:45 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an
election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore
2/3rds should
be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over
labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are
unlikely to be achieved :D
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/votin
g-intent
ion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con
majority without the DUP.
Those poll figures would also see Labour lose another 40 seats, and then be
100 behind the Tories.
Therefore Corbyn would have no alternative but to resign, and there would
have to be a leadership contest.
Who was it that mentioned Corbyn was playing a smart game?
He's playing a very smart game by not falling for Johnson's trickery
today.
You think so? It seems that we're increasingly no-deal Brexit-bound -
but instead of BJ winning the struggle, this is being achieved by Corbyn
losing it. As has been oft-suggested, as a not-so-closet leaver he might
not be all that disappointed in his failure.
How did you come to that conclusion when the whole point of the last
two days in Parliament is to introduce a Bill that blocks a no-deal
Brexit? And this Bill will pass through the House of Lords by 5 p.m.
on Friday (tomorrow), as the Tories' planned filibuster was abandoned
during the night.

MM
MM
2019-09-04 09:53:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-intention-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.

MM
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 10:08:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions
that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-inte
ntion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
They can’t avoid it, because they have already fallen into it.

Labour’s question is, how do they get out of it without losing even more
MPs than they now have?

Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
Dan S. MacAbre
2019-09-04 10:38:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by MM
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions
that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-inte
ntion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
They can’t avoid it, because they have already fallen into it.
Labour’s question is, how do they get out of it without losing even more
MPs than they now have?
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
ISTM that Jeremy's opinion of the EU has generally been at odds with the
party's. It can't be an easy problem to resolve. I suppose that, in a
sense, he has the same problem that Boris has; except that there is no
great pressure to resolve it.
Incubus
2019-09-04 10:59:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by MM
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions
that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-inte
ntion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
They can’t avoid it, because they have already fallen into it.
Labour’s question is, how do they get out of it without losing even more
MPs than they now have?
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
ISTM that Jeremy's opinion of the EU has generally been at odds with the
party's. It can't be an easy problem to resolve. I suppose that, in a
sense, he has the same problem that Boris has; except that there is no
great pressure to resolve it.
Corbyn is playing the role of grubby opportunist. If he had a plan to move
things forward, he'd put it forward and call for a General Election.
Roger
2019-09-04 11:09:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Corbyn is playing the role of grubby opportunist. If he had a plan to move
things forward, he'd put it forward and call for a General Election.
To be fair to Corbyn he is in a bit of a corner....most Labor MP's are remainers, most Labour constituencies voted leave.
Incubus
2019-09-04 11:17:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by Incubus
Corbyn is playing the role of grubby opportunist. If he had a plan to move
things forward, he'd put it forward and call for a General Election.
To be fair to Corbyn he is in a bit of a corner....most Labor MP's are remainers, most Labour constituencies voted leave.
Typical Labour, out of touch with the people and no smooth-talking Blair to
fool them. Nevertheless, his actions might prove thoroughly destructive or
lead to Britain not leaving the EU. I have no sympathy for him. In fact, I
had to turn the television off last night while he was talking in the House of
Commons. Never have I wanted to punch him as much as I did last night and I
don't consider myself a violent man.
Dan S. MacAbre
2019-09-04 11:26:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Roger
Post by Incubus
Corbyn is playing the role of grubby opportunist. If he had a plan to move
things forward, he'd put it forward and call for a General Election.
To be fair to Corbyn he is in a bit of a corner....most Labor MP's are remainers, most Labour constituencies voted leave.
Typical Labour, out of touch with the people and no smooth-talking Blair to
fool them. Nevertheless, his actions might prove thoroughly destructive or
lead to Britain not leaving the EU. I have no sympathy for him. In fact, I
had to turn the television off last night while he was talking in the House of
Commons. Never have I wanted to punch him as much as I did last night and I
don't consider myself a violent man.
Politicians seem to have a gift for bringing out the worst in people. I
guess it's because they pretend to have our interests at heart, when
really, they only have their own. As a career, it is probably too
rewarding.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 11:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Roger
Corbyn is playing the role of grubby opportunist. If he had a plan to move
things forward, he'd put it forward and call for a General Election.
To be fair to Corbyn he is in a bit of a corner....most Labor MP's are
remainers, most Labour constituencies voted leave.
Typical Labour, out of touch with the people and no smooth-talking Blair to
fool them. Nevertheless, his actions might prove thoroughly destructive or
lead to Britain not leaving the EU. I have no sympathy for him. In fact, I
had to turn the television off last night while he was talking in the House of
Commons. Never have I wanted to punch him as much as I did last night and I
don't consider myself a violent man.
Politicians seem to have a gift for bringing out the worst in people. I
guess it's because they pretend to have our interests at heart, when
really, they only have their own. As a career, it is probably too
rewarding.
Guy Fawkes had the right idea after all.....
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 11:38:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan S. MacAbre
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by MM
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds
should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions
that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-in
te
ntion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
They can’t avoid it, because they have already fallen into it.
Labour’s question is, how do they get out of it without losing even more
MPs than they now have?
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
ISTM that Jeremy's opinion of the EU has generally been at odds with the
party's. It can't be an easy problem to resolve. I suppose that, in a
sense, he has the same problem that Boris has; except that there is no
great pressure to resolve it.
But there would be if a general election was forced.

It would not surprise me if the Blairite faction voted with the Boris faction
in a no confidence proposal, simply to put Corbyn on the spot and make him
come out either for or against the EU.

His prevarication would probably be enough to get rid of him.
Roger
2019-09-04 10:56:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
They have a policy on the EU; don't commit to anything.

According to the polls it isn't working, but this does not appear to bother them.

So, either there is something we don't know or they are a bunch of idiots. Take your pick....personally I have no idea!
Keema's Nan
2019-09-04 11:39:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
They have a policy on the EU; don't commit to anything.
According to the polls it isn't working, but this does not appear to bother them.
So, either there is something we don't know or they are a bunch of idiots.
Take your pick....personally I have no idea!
I’ll pick bunch of idiots thanks; and a divided bunch at that.
abelard
2019-09-04 11:47:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Looks like they need a policy on the EU, and quick. In or out, which is it
Jeremy?
They have a policy on the EU; don't commit to anything.
According to the polls it isn't working, but this does not appear to bother them.
like most people, 'they' believe what they want to believe....

they believe 'the people' are for them...if only 'the people'
understood them
Post by Roger
So, either there is something we don't know or they are a bunch of idiots. Take your pick....personally I have no idea!
MM
2019-09-05 09:04:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Sep 2019 11:08:28 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by MM
Post by Roger
Post by abelard
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:33:11 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
Post by Keema's Nan
Yes. You are missing the whole point of the BoJo strategy; as are many
others
like you.
Well I've talked about that elsewhere.
Here I am specifically adressing the case that Boris, in the case that
parliament forces the PM to request an extension, hands in his
resignation.
As far as I can see this does not automatically trigger an election. If
the
PM resigns parliament must either vote or a general election (which
requires
a vote with a 2/3 majority), or they must appoint a new PM.
Corbyn says he is favour of an early election, and therefore 2/3rds should be
no problem.
Ah, but Corbyn, quite rightly, doesn't trust Boris Johnson to stick to
the election date of, so far, 14 October. That's why Corbyn demanded
tonight that Royal Assent first be granted to the Bill that will have
been passed by the House of Commons AND the House of Lords. Only after
the RA is fact would Labour consider giving in to Boris's election
wish.
MM
Of course the fact that the Conservatives lead the polls with 10 points
over labour and rising has nothing to do with Corbyn imposing conditions
that are unlikely to be achieved :D
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
Post by Roger
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2019/09/03/voting-inte
ntion-con-35-lab-25-lib-dem-16-brex-11-
That was the situation yesterday evening...those figures would restore a
con majority without the DUP.
Doesn't matter if there's not going to be a general election now,
because Labour is going to avoid the trap set by Johnson.
They can’t avoid it, because they have already fallen into it.
Oh, so that's why Boris lost for a fourth time last night! (Or was it
a fifth time already? I'm losing count.)

MM
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2019-09-03 10:04:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
AFAIK the PM cannot call an election, it requires a 2/3 majority vote of
parliament to do that;
Or a vote of no confidence, and Boris will interpret the blocking of
“no-deal” as a vote of no confidence in him, because he has insisted that
we will definitely leave without a deal on Oct 31st if he is PM.
The Fixed Term Parliaments Act says he can't do that. To force an
election, a no-confidence vote has to be in exactly the wording
specified by the Act.
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
otherwise the onus is on parliament to appoint a new
PM, who would inherit the responsibility of blocking Brexit.
Is there something I'm missing here?
I agree with you, but there may be a way of forcing a no-confidence
motion through the Commons that we haven't thought of.
--
Evremonde
Roger
2019-09-03 10:21:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
AFAIK the PM cannot call an election, it requires a 2/3 majority vote of
parliament to do that;
Or a vote of no confidence, and Boris will interpret the blocking of
“no-deal” as a vote of no confidence in him, because he has insisted that
we will definitely leave without a deal on Oct 31st if he is PM.
The Fixed Term Parliaments Act says he can't do that. To force an
election, a no-confidence vote has to be in exactly the wording
specified by the Act.
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
otherwise the onus is on parliament to appoint a new
PM, who would inherit the responsibility of blocking Brexit.
Is there something I'm missing here?
I agree with you, but there may be a way of forcing a no-confidence
motion through the Commons that we haven't thought of.
--
Evremonde
Even if there is a no-confidence, it is still up to parliament to decide what to do; vote or appoint a new PM.

And I think this is what he has in mind; if parliament pass a motion that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly what he manifested he would not do then he would take a step backward and leave it for parliament to decide what to do(and take the responsibility).
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2019-09-03 12:01:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Even if there is a no-confidence, it is still up to parliament to
decide what to do; vote or appoint a new PM.
No, I don't think so. If a no-confidence motion is passed, the
government falls, the PM must go to the Queen and resign, and she must
then decide whether to ask somebody else to form a government or whether
a general election must take place.
Post by Roger
And I think this is what he has in mind; if parliament pass a motion
that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly what he manifested he would not do
then he would take a step backward and leave it for parliament to
decide what to do(and take the responsibility).
Yes, morally speaking I think he would have to personally resign, but
that would not take the government down with him. I can't imagine what
would happen then; there would have to be another Tory leadership
contest, taking weeks and with no likelihood of an improved situation.
Perhaps instead HMQ would ask one of the Tory remainers to step in. ISTR
something similar happened in the Gladstone /Palmerston /Disraeli era.
--
Evremonde
Roger
2019-09-03 12:56:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
No, I don't think so. If a no-confidence motion is passed, the
government falls, the PM must go to the Queen and resign, and she must
then decide whether to ask somebody else to form a government or whether
a general election must take place.
I think like all things regarding the Queen, she will act on the basis of the indications given by parliament. I think her only role is to establish who is a bona fide representative of parliament or if two different camps both claimed to represent parliament.
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Yes, morally speaking I think he would have to personally resign, but
that would not take the government down with him. I can't imagine what
would happen then; there would have to be another Tory leadership
contest, taking weeks and with no likelihood of an improved situation.
Perhaps instead HMQ would ask one of the Tory remainers to step in. ISTR
something similar happened in the Gladstone /Palmerston /Disraeli era.
Well...no. Whosoever HMQ nominates to be the PM must, at least nominally, reperesent a majority in parliament. That does not mean it must be a Tory. I believe a PM cannot obtain executive powers without parliament having the possibility of a no confidence vote, but I don't know exactly how it works.

On the other hand what if nobody comes forward....we are in this empasse because nobody wants the blame for blocking Brexit.

Here in Italy the President can, and has, nominated technicians as PM. Last year when parliament had been haggling for weeks about who should form a government the president nominated a technician to start forming a government which would have been sworn in after a few days after he completed his list of ministers. It was like a ticking time bomb, and it worked.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-03 14:35:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Roger
Even if there is a no-confidence, it is still up to parliament to
decide what to do; vote or appoint a new PM.
No, I don't think so. If a no-confidence motion is passed, the
government falls, the PM must go to the Queen and resign, and she must
then decide whether to ask somebody else to form a government or whether
a general election must take place.
Post by Roger
And I think this is what he has in mind; if parliament pass a motion
that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly what he manifested he would not do
then he would take a step backward and leave it for parliament to
decide what to do(and take the responsibility).
Yes, morally speaking I think he would have to personally resign, but
that would not take the government down with him.
But the confidence motion might be that the house has no confidence in the
government, not just the PM.
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
I can't imagine what
would happen then; there would have to be another Tory leadership
contest, taking weeks and with no likelihood of an improved situation.
Perhaps instead HMQ would ask one of the Tory remainers to step in. ISTR
something similar happened in the Gladstone /Palmerston /Disraeli era.
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2019-09-03 19:52:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Roger
Even if there is a no-confidence, it is still up to parliament to
decide what to do; vote or appoint a new PM.
No, I don't think so. If a no-confidence motion is passed, the
government falls, the PM must go to the Queen and resign, and she must
then decide whether to ask somebody else to form a government or whether
a general election must take place.
Post by Roger
And I think this is what he has in mind; if parliament pass a motion
that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly what he manifested he would not do
then he would take a step backward and leave it for parliament to
decide what to do(and take the responsibility).
Yes, morally speaking I think he would have to personally resign, but
that would not take the government down with him.
But the confidence motion might be that the house has no confidence in the
government, not just the PM.
They are two different scenarios. The one I was addressing just above
was where "parliament pass a motion that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly
what he manifested he would not do". I addressed the no-confidence vote
scenario in the previous passage.
--
Evremonde
abelard
2019-09-03 21:30:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 15:35:43 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by Roger
Even if there is a no-confidence, it is still up to parliament to
decide what to do; vote or appoint a new PM.
No, I don't think so. If a no-confidence motion is passed, the
government falls, the PM must go to the Queen and resign, and she must
then decide whether to ask somebody else to form a government or whether
a general election must take place.
Post by Roger
And I think this is what he has in mind; if parliament pass a motion
that obliges the 'PM' to do exactly what he manifested he would not do
then he would take a step backward and leave it for parliament to
decide what to do(and take the responsibility).
Yes, morally speaking I think he would have to personally resign, but
that would not take the government down with him.
But the confidence motion might be that the house has no confidence in the
government, not just the PM.
that wont happen because that would be voting against
their own dictatorial power
--
www.abelard.org
MM
2019-09-03 23:07:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:03:03 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and
the EU actually delivered,
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days, and
what has Boris achieved? Precisely nothing so far. Brussels said today
that there is not even a whiff of any new plan from Boris.

MM
Roger
2019-09-04 05:44:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
Post by Keema's Nan
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days, and
what has Boris achieved? Precisely nothing so far. Brussels said today
that there is not even a whiff of any new plan from Boris.
Wasn't that 12 days ago?

BTW, It was Barnier who made that comment, not the EU. He is a bit miffed because Boris had effectively cut him out of the loop by arranging to present his proposal pretty much directly to the summit.

Seems to me that the opposition to Boris is determined to prevent him presenting his proposal....despite not having alternatives.
MM
2019-09-04 09:57:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger
Post by MM
Post by Keema's Nan
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days, and
what has Boris achieved? Precisely nothing so far. Brussels said today
that there is not even a whiff of any new plan from Boris.
Wasn't that 12 days ago?
BTW, It was Barnier who made that comment, not the EU.
Try sticking to the facts:
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/aug/21/merkel-gives-johnson-30-days-to-find-solution-to-avoid-no-deal-brexit
Post by Roger
He is a bit miffed because Boris had effectively cut him out of the loop by arranging to present his proposal pretty much directly to the summit.
Seems to me that the opposition to Boris is determined to prevent him presenting his proposal....despite not having alternatives.
Well, if Boris was trusted more, maybe he'd be in a better place right
now.

Instead of Shithole City.

MM
Roger
2019-09-04 10:45:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/aug/21/merkel-gives-johnson-30-days-to-find-solution-to-avoid-no-deal-brexit
I was reffering to Barnier who made the comment about not having received anything.....he's miffed because Boris went straight to his peers instead of through him.
Post by MM
Well, if Boris was trusted more, maybe he'd be in a better place right
now.
I doubt it, politics never works that way. And probably a good thing.
The Marquis Saint Evremonde
2019-09-04 07:37:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:03:03 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and
the EU actually delivered,
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days,
You're saying that, because Merkel told Boris to do this, he has to
follow orders?

Chairmany calling ... Chairmany calling ... MM here ...
--
Evremonde
MM
2019-09-04 10:00:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Sep 2019 08:37:37 +0100, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by MM
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:03:03 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and
the EU actually delivered,
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days,
You're saying that, because Merkel told Boris to do this, he has to
follow orders?
Chairmany calling ... Chairmany calling ... MM here ...
But Boris keeps telling everybody that he's making progress with an
alternative to the backstop. Trouble is, no one in the EU has seen his
cunning plan yet. (Although Labour has seen through his other cunning
plan...)

MM
Roger
2019-09-04 10:53:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MM
On Wed, 4 Sep 2019 08:37:37 +0100, The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by The Marquis Saint Evremonde
Post by MM
On Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:03:03 +0100, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by Roger
If parliament obliged the PM to accept an extension if the EU offered it, and
the EU actually delivered,
We have an extension, currently. Has this led to any extra negotiating offers
from the EU?
It is not up to the EU to make ~any~offers! Have you not been
following developments since Boris became PM? Merkel told Boris to
find an acceptable alternative to the backstop within 30 days,
You're saying that, because Merkel told Boris to do this, he has to
follow orders?
Chairmany calling ... Chairmany calling ... MM here ...
But Boris keeps telling everybody that he's making progress with an
alternative to the backstop. Trouble is, no one in the EU has seen his
cunning plan yet. (Although Labour has seen through his other cunning
plan...)
MM
As above....It was Barnier who has not seen anything. Merkel and Macron are not expecting to see his proposals for another 20 days. Who exactly should have seen them? Should the EU have monitors inspecting his working draughts?

In reality, off the record we do actually know more.....indiscrecision following Merkels visit suggests that he is making proposals (actually reworking proposals that are not new) whereby the UK makes explicit committments and undertakings for the NI border to eliminate the backstop. Yes...Barnier does not want to negotiate it, but he's not the boss....in fact he's at the end of his mandate.
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