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So Rees-Mogg wants Parliament back in the office......
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Roger
2020-05-20 10:34:57 UTC
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.....but other MP's don't agree.

Would it be too radical to suggest that they have a little debate and vote on it? Or perhaps that's just not the way parliament works :D
m***@btopenworld.com
2020-05-21 06:40:31 UTC
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Post by Roger
.....but other MP's don't agree.
Would it be too radical to suggest that they have a little debate and vote on it? Or perhaps that's just not the way parliament works :D
No it doesn't! Parliament does not formulate government policy nor even set its own agenda. Parliament's major role is support the smooth passage of pre-determined government business through the two houses.

Should any government lose the support of parliament then its true to say that it has had its day.
m***@btopenworld.com
2020-05-21 07:48:51 UTC
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Post by m***@btopenworld.com
No it doesn't! Parliament does not formulate government policy nor even set its own agenda.
Private member bills?
Emergency debates?
Seems to me the speaker can, and often does, authorise debates on any motion, and anything the parliament votes becomes law......subject to Royal Seal of course.
IIRC the actual rules that allow MP's to debate and vote from home were debatd and voted in parliament?
The progress of any bill through Paliament is controlled by government via the Office of the Leader of the House. If any bill cannot be allowed sufficient parliamentary time on the floor of the house it cannot progress and will eventually die.

Any MP may place a bill before the house and dozens are introduced every week. A ballot of members then determines which shall be granted parliamentary shall be granted parliamentary time under the 10 minute rule. Under this rule the proposer of the motion is given 10 minutes to present his bill to the house. After 10 minutes discussion then stops abruptly and the only chance for the bill is if the government in cabinet grants it parliamentary time. If not, it dies. A very few private members bills survive this route to legislation.

Emergency debates come about as the result of triumvirate discussions involving the speaker, the prime minister and the Leader of the Opposition with the government of the day holding power of veto No government is ever obliged to concede and emergency debate. The Speaker cannot initiate debates.
Roger
2020-05-21 09:25:37 UTC
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Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
No it doesn't! Parliament does not formulate government policy nor even set its own agenda.
Private member bills?
Emergency debates?
Seems to me the speaker can, and often does, authorise debates on any motion, and anything the parliament votes becomes law......subject to Royal Seal of course.
IIRC the actual rules that allow MP's to debate and vote from home were debatd and voted in parliament?
The progress of any bill through Paliament is controlled by government via the Office of the Leader of the House. If any bill cannot be allowed sufficient parliamentary time on the floor of the house it cannot progress and will eventually die.
Any MP may place a bill before the house and dozens are introduced every week. A ballot of members then determines which shall be granted parliamentary shall be granted parliamentary time under the 10 minute rule. Under this rule the proposer of the motion is given 10 minutes to present his bill to the house. After 10 minutes discussion then stops abruptly and the only chance for the bill is if the government in cabinet grants it parliamentary time. If not, it dies. A very few private members bills survive this route to legislation.
Emergency debates come about as the result of triumvirate discussions involving the speaker, the prime minister and the Leader of the Opposition with the government of the day holding power of veto No government is ever obliged to concede and emergency debate. The Speaker cannot initiate debates.
No government is ever obliged to cencede to an emergency debate? I never knew that. I thought MP's themselves could vote a motion to have an emergency debate. How does government actually block such a motion?
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