Discussion:
Anne Sacoolas is high level CIA agent
(too old to reply)
Keema's Nan
2020-02-10 09:35:25 UTC
Permalink
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail on
Sunday can reveal.

Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing into
the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is understood to
have served as a senior spy.

British Ministers and officials are aware of Mrs Sacoolas’s career in
espionage, but she was not declared as an agent when she came to the UK
alongside her intelligence officer husband Jonathan.

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said that, following our revelation,
‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the US government
was blocking her extradition to face justice.

Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the wrong
side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.

Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas family
were able to flee in the days after the crash, but the US government claim
they notified the Foreign Office that they were leaving.

Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton
and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is refusing to return
to Britain.

Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton
and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is refusing to return
to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn

However Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have
vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.

Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs
Sacoolas’s CIA background, but the American government insist she was not
spying on Britain.

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (pictured) said that, following our
revelation, ‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the
US government was blocking her extradition to face justice

US government sources said Mrs Sacoolas was ‘not active’ in the UK,
although a security source said: ‘You never really leave the CIA.’

One government source even claimed Mrs Sacoolas had been ‘more senior than
her husband’ in the US intelligence community.

Ms Charles told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Things are now beginning to
fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we could not understand how
anybody could just get on a plane after such a catastrophic crash and leave a
devastated family behind.

‘We have also found it impossible to figure out why the US administration
has behaved in the lawless way it has in harbouring Anne Sacoolas. But no one
is above the law. Whether or not you are a CIA officer, a diplomat or anyone
else, the Vienna Convention states that you must abide by and respect the
rules and regulations of the host country.

‘Her leaving, and the US government protecting her and refusing the
extradition request, is nothing short of a disgrace and we will not stand for
it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will not rest until
she does.’

Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the wrong
side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer. Pictured: Mrs
Sacoolas

Our revelation comes at a time of strained diplomatic relations between the
UK and America over Boris Johnson’s refusal to ban Chinese tech giant
Huawei from building part of Britain’s 5G phone network, as well as the US
refusal to extradite Mrs Sacoolas.

In contrast, Home Secretary Priti Patel last week gave the green light to
extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful businessmen, to face
a US fraud case. Her decision opened up Tory divisions, with former Cabinet
Minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on Sunday – on the facing
page – to brand the US-UK extradition arrangements ‘a bad treaty’.

The UK and US governments insist that, at the time of the accident, Mrs
Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity while her husband was working as technical
staffer at the Northamptonshire air base. The Foreign Office confirmed that
Mrs Sacoolas ‘was notified to us as a spouse with no official role’ –
but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed they knew of her CIA history.

Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have vowed to
keep fighting to bring Mrs Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured left to
right:Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother), Tracey
Dunn and Bruce Charles

The US State Department declined to comment on our revelations yesterday,
saying only: ‘The driver was the spouse of an accredited diplomat to the
United Kingdom.’

In December the Crown Prosecution Service announced it was charging Mrs
Sacoolas over Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14 years
in prison was ‘not proportionate’ for what was ‘a terrible but
unintentional accident’.

And last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family.

Last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry

However Ms Patel’s approval of the extradition of Mr Lynch has exposed an
imbalance in the US-UK extradition arrangements. Former Brexit Secretary Mr
Davis is furious that Ms Patel allowed the billionaire to be extradited to
face criminal charges in the US before a separate civil fraud case against
him in London’s High Court reaches its conclusion.

Mr Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy into a FTSE 100 heavyweight
before it was sold to Hewlett-Packard in 2011 for £8.3 billion, handed
himself over to police last week and was released on £10 million bail. He is
accused of fraudulently inflating the value of Autonomy before it was sold to
HP, making him a fortune.

He denies the allegations and claims the American firm botched the takeover.

His lawyers have argued that the case should be heard in British courts, not
in America, because Mr Lynch is a British citizen who ran a British company
listed on the London Stock Exchange which was governed by English law and UK
accounting standards.

Mr Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, went with Mr Davis to meet Ms Patel at the
end of last month and pleaded with her to wait until the conclusion of the
High Court trial.

Writing in today’s Mail on Sunday, Mr Davis accuses Ms Patel of
‘spiriting’ Mr Lynch away to America before the verdict and says the
decision shows how the extradition treaty is skewed too heavily in favour of
America, while doing little to protect Britons.

‘When the US Department of Justice requests the extradition of a UK
citizen, we effectively have no choice but to cough them up,’ he writes.

But when UK authorities want to extradite an American ‘the US Secretary of
State “may” process the request. What the US “may” choose to do was
made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of Harry
Dunn’.

Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.
abelard
2020-02-10 10:46:37 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:35:25 +0000, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail on
Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing into
the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is understood to
have served as a senior spy.
i warned you that you were making an assumption!
--
www.abelard.org
Keema's Nan
2020-02-10 11:23:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:35:25 +0000, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail on
Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing into
the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is understood to
have served as a senior spy.
i warned you that you were making an assumption!
Did you? I don’t remember that.

What assumption was I making?
abelard
2020-02-10 11:42:57 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 11:23:22 +0000, Keema's Nan
Post by abelard
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:35:25 +0000, Keema's Nan
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail on
Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing into
the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is understood to
have served as a senior spy.
i warned you that you were making an assumption!
Did you? I don’t remember that.
old age gets to us all
What assumption was I making?
--
www.abelard.org
Ophelia
2020-02-10 11:13:24 UTC
Permalink
"Keema's Nan" wrote in message news:***@news.giganews.com...


The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail
on
Sunday can reveal.

Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing into
the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is understood to
have served as a senior spy.

British Ministers and officials are aware of Mrs Sacoolas’s career in
espionage, but she was not declared as an agent when she came to the UK
alongside her intelligence officer husband Jonathan.

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said that, following our revelation,
‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the US government
was blocking her extradition to face justice.

Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the wrong
side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.

Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas family
were able to flee in the days after the crash, but the US government claim
they notified the Foreign Office that they were leaving.

Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton
and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is refusing to return
to Britain.

Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton
and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is refusing to return
to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn

However Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have
vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.

Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs
Sacoolas’s CIA background, but the American government insist she was not
spying on Britain.

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (pictured) said that, following our
revelation, ‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the
US government was blocking her extradition to face justice

US government sources said Mrs Sacoolas was ‘not active’ in the UK,
although a security source said: ‘You never really leave the CIA.’

One government source even claimed Mrs Sacoolas had been ‘more senior than
her husband’ in the US intelligence community.

Ms Charles told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Things are now beginning to
fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we could not understand how
anybody could just get on a plane after such a catastrophic crash and leave
a
devastated family behind.

‘We have also found it impossible to figure out why the US administration
has behaved in the lawless way it has in harbouring Anne Sacoolas. But no
one
is above the law. Whether or not you are a CIA officer, a diplomat or anyone
else, the Vienna Convention states that you must abide by and respect the
rules and regulations of the host country.

‘Her leaving, and the US government protecting her and refusing the
extradition request, is nothing short of a disgrace and we will not stand
for
it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will not rest until
she does.’

Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the wrong
side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer. Pictured: Mrs
Sacoolas

Our revelation comes at a time of strained diplomatic relations between the
UK and America over Boris Johnson’s refusal to ban Chinese tech giant
Huawei from building part of Britain’s 5G phone network, as well as the US
refusal to extradite Mrs Sacoolas.

In contrast, Home Secretary Priti Patel last week gave the green light to
extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful businessmen, to face
a US fraud case. Her decision opened up Tory divisions, with former Cabinet
Minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on Sunday – on the facing
page – to brand the US-UK extradition arrangements ‘a bad treaty’.

The UK and US governments insist that, at the time of the accident, Mrs
Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity while her husband was working as technical
staffer at the Northamptonshire air base. The Foreign Office confirmed that
Mrs Sacoolas ‘was notified to us as a spouse with no official role’ –
but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed they knew of her CIA history.

Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have vowed to
keep fighting to bring Mrs Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured left to
right:Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother), Tracey
Dunn and Bruce Charles

The US State Department declined to comment on our revelations yesterday,
saying only: ‘The driver was the spouse of an accredited diplomat to the
United Kingdom.’

In December the Crown Prosecution Service announced it was charging Mrs
Sacoolas over Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14 years
in prison was ‘not proportionate’ for what was ‘a terrible but
unintentional accident’.

And last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family.

Last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry

However Ms Patel’s approval of the extradition of Mr Lynch has exposed an
imbalance in the US-UK extradition arrangements. Former Brexit Secretary Mr
Davis is furious that Ms Patel allowed the billionaire to be extradited to
face criminal charges in the US before a separate civil fraud case against
him in London’s High Court reaches its conclusion.

Mr Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy into a FTSE 100
heavyweight
before it was sold to Hewlett-Packard in 2011 for £8.3 billion, handed
himself over to police last week and was released on £10 million bail. He is
accused of fraudulently inflating the value of Autonomy before it was sold
to
HP, making him a fortune.

He denies the allegations and claims the American firm botched the takeover.

His lawyers have argued that the case should be heard in British courts, not
in America, because Mr Lynch is a British citizen who ran a British company
listed on the London Stock Exchange which was governed by English law and UK
accounting standards.

Mr Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, went with Mr Davis to meet Ms Patel at the
end of last month and pleaded with her to wait until the conclusion of the
High Court trial.

Writing in today’s Mail on Sunday, Mr Davis accuses Ms Patel of
‘spiriting’ Mr Lynch away to America before the verdict and says the
decision shows how the extradition treaty is skewed too heavily in favour of
America, while doing little to protect Britons.

‘When the US Department of Justice requests the extradition of a UK
citizen, we effectively have no choice but to cough them up,’ he writes.

But when UK authorities want to extradite an American ‘the US Secretary of
State “may” process the request. What the US “may” choose to do was
made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of
Harry
Dunn’.

Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.

===

Thanks for posting that.
CheeseySock
2020-02-10 22:56:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The
Mail on Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing
into the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is
understood to have served as a senior spy.
British Ministers and officials are aware of Mrs Sacoolas’s career in
espionage, but she was not declared as an agent when she came to the UK
alongside her intelligence officer husband Jonathan.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said that, following our revelation,
‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the US
government was blocking her extradition to face justice.
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas
family were able to flee in the days after the crash, but the US
government claim they notified the Foreign Office that they were
leaving.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn
However Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have
vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.
Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs
Sacoolas’s CIA background, but the American government insist she was
not spying on Britain.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (pictured) said that, following our
revelation, ‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the
US government was blocking her extradition to face justice
US government sources said Mrs Sacoolas was ‘not active’ in the UK,
although a security source said: ‘You never really leave the CIA.’
One government source even claimed Mrs Sacoolas had been ‘more senior
than her husband’ in the US intelligence community.
Ms Charles told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Things are now beginning
to fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we could not
understand how anybody could just get on a plane after such a
catastrophic crash and leave a devastated family behind.
‘We have also found it impossible to figure out why the US
administration has behaved in the lawless way it has in harbouring Anne
Sacoolas. But no one is above the law. Whether or not you are a CIA
officer, a diplomat or anyone else, the Vienna Convention states that
you must abide by and respect the rules and regulations of the host
country.
‘Her leaving, and the US government protecting her and refusing the
extradition request, is nothing short of a disgrace and we will not
stand for it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will
not rest until she does.’
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Pictured: Mrs Sacoolas
Our revelation comes at a time of strained diplomatic relations between
the UK and America over Boris Johnson’s refusal to ban Chinese tech
giant Huawei from building part of Britain’s 5G phone network, as well
as the US refusal to extradite Mrs Sacoolas.
In contrast, Home Secretary Priti Patel last week gave the green light
to extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful businessmen,
to face a US fraud case. Her decision opened up Tory divisions, with
former Cabinet Minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on
Sunday – on the facing page – to brand the US-UK extradition
arrangements ‘a bad treaty’.
The UK and US governments insist that, at the time of the accident, Mrs
Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity while her husband was working as
technical staffer at the Northamptonshire air base. The Foreign Office
confirmed that Mrs Sacoolas ‘was notified to us as a spouse with no
official role’ – but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed they knew
of her CIA history.
Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have vowed to
keep fighting to bring Mrs Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured left to
right:Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother),
Tracey Dunn and Bruce Charles
The US State Department declined to comment on our revelations
yesterday, saying only: ‘The driver was the spouse of an accredited
diplomat to the United Kingdom.’
In December the Crown Prosecution Service announced it was charging Mrs
Sacoolas over Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14
years in prison was ‘not proportionate’ for what was ‘a terrible but
unintentional accident’.
And last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to
the devastation of Harry’s family.
Last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry
However Ms Patel’s approval of the extradition of Mr Lynch has exposed
an imbalance in the US-UK extradition arrangements. Former Brexit
Secretary Mr Davis is furious that Ms Patel allowed the billionaire to
be extradited to face criminal charges in the US before a separate civil
fraud case against him in London’s High Court reaches its conclusion.
Mr Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy into a FTSE 100
heavyweight before it was sold to Hewlett-Packard in 2011 for £8.3
billion, handed himself over to police last week and was released on £10
million bail. He is accused of fraudulently inflating the value of
Autonomy before it was sold to HP, making him a fortune.
He denies the allegations and claims the American firm botched the takeover.
His lawyers have argued that the case should be heard in British courts,
not in America, because Mr Lynch is a British citizen who ran a British
company listed on the London Stock Exchange which was governed by
English law and UK accounting standards.
Mr Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, went with Mr Davis to meet Ms Patel at
the end of last month and pleaded with her to wait until the conclusion
of the High Court trial.
Writing in today’s Mail on Sunday, Mr Davis accuses Ms Patel of
‘spiriting’ Mr Lynch away to America before the verdict and says the
decision shows how the extradition treaty is skewed too heavily in
favour of America, while doing little to protect Britons.
‘When the US Department of Justice requests the extradition of a UK
citizen, we effectively have no choice but to cough them up,’ he writes.
But when UK authorities want to extradite an American ‘the US Secretary
of State “may” process the request. What the US “may” choose to do was
made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of
Harry Dunn’.
Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America (do they
drive round their own yank-in-uk base on right (wrong) side of the
road... that is probably the problem... if they drove round yankster base
on left side of road they would be fit for driving on uk roads, if not
maybe they can be flattened by a yank tank driving on left (right) side
of the road on their own fucking base eh!)
CheeseySock
2020-02-10 23:16:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by CheeseySock
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America
fortunately they got lots of long straight bits of road!

and only one logical way onto a dual carriageway... except possibly at
traffic lights/crossroads.. LOL
CheeseySock
2020-02-10 23:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by CheeseySock
Post by CheeseySock
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America
fortunately they got lots of long straight bits of road!
and only one logical way onto a dual carriageway... except possibly at
traffic lights/crossroads.. LOL
and the fuckers switched what side front brakes on a bike are eh! LOL...
JNugent
2020-02-11 02:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by CheeseySock
Post by CheeseySock
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America
fortunately they got lots of long straight bits of road!
and only one logical way onto a dual carriageway... except possibly at
traffic lights/crossroads.. LOL
;-)

Don't remind me... Roosevelt Drive in Philadelphia... At one point it
has four carriageways side by side. Turning onto that road in the dark
at a set of traffic lights, I found after a couple of hundred yards that
I was going the wrong way. Luckily it was very late and there was
literally no other traffic. I was able to make a three-point and get
back along the road in the correct direction.
m***@btopenworld.com
2020-02-11 19:17:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by CheeseySock
Post by CheeseySock
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America
fortunately they got lots of long straight bits of road!
and only one logical way onto a dual carriageway... except possibly at
traffic lights/crossroads.. LOL
;-)
Don't remind me... Roosevelt Drive in Philadelphia... At one point it
has four carriageways side by side. Turning onto that road in the dark
at a set of traffic lights, I found after a couple of hundred yards that
I was going the wrong way. Luckily it was very late and there was
literally no other traffic. I was able to make a three-point and get
I wonder whether there is one British driver who when driving on US roads has not found himself on the wrong side of the road after turning a corner In my case it has been twice in separate trips The first was in Billings Montana and the second (the hairy one0 Washington D.C. That's where I ended up in the hands of the cops, Fortunately they let me go after checking my UK licence and were very polite about it.

I think that it's an experience that every British driver needs and you never do it twice!
Post by JNugent
back along the road in the correct direction.
Keema's Nan
2020-02-11 20:24:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by JNugent
Post by CheeseySock
Post by CheeseySock
got to say I have found myself on wrong side of road in America
fortunately they got lots of long straight bits of road!
and only one logical way onto a dual carriageway... except possibly at
traffic lights/crossroads.. LOL
;-)
Don't remind me... Roosevelt Drive in Philadelphia... At one point it
has four carriageways side by side. Turning onto that road in the dark
at a set of traffic lights, I found after a couple of hundred yards that
I was going the wrong way. Luckily it was very late and there was
literally no other traffic. I was able to make a three-point and get
I wonder whether there is one British driver who when driving on US roads has
not found himself on the wrong side of the road after turning a corner In my
case it has been twice in separate trips The first was in Billings Montana
and the second (the hairy one0 Washington D.C. That's where I ended up in the
hands of the cops, Fortunately they let me go after checking my UK licence
Liar. You had diplomatic immunity because you were a spy.
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
and were very polite about it.
I think that it's an experience that every British driver needs and you never do it twice!
Does that mitigate the charge of causing death by dangerous driving?
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by JNugent
back along the road in the correct direction.
CheeseySock
2020-02-10 23:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The
Mail on Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing
into the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is
understood to have served as a senior spy.
British Ministers and officials are aware of Mrs Sacoolas’s career in
espionage, but she was not declared as an agent when she came to the UK
alongside her intelligence officer husband Jonathan.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said that, following our revelation,
‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the US
government was blocking her extradition to face justice.
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas
family were able to flee in the days after the crash, but the US
government claim they notified the Foreign Office that they were
leaving.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn
However Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have
vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.
Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs
Sacoolas’s CIA background, but the American government insist she was
not spying on Britain.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (pictured) said that, following our
revelation, ‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the
US government was blocking her extradition to face justice
US government sources said Mrs Sacoolas was ‘not active’ in the UK,
although a security source said: ‘You never really leave the CIA.’
One government source even claimed Mrs Sacoolas had been ‘more senior
than her husband’ in the US intelligence community.
Ms Charles told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Things are now beginning
to fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we could not
understand how anybody could just get on a plane after such a
catastrophic crash and leave a devastated family behind.
‘We have also found it impossible to figure out why the US
administration has behaved in the lawless way it has in harbouring Anne
Sacoolas. But no one is above the law. Whether or not you are a CIA
officer, a diplomat or anyone else, the Vienna Convention states that
you must abide by and respect the rules and regulations of the host
country.
‘Her leaving, and the US government protecting her and refusing the
extradition request, is nothing short of a disgrace and we will not
stand for it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will
not rest until she does.’
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Pictured: Mrs Sacoolas
Our revelation comes at a time of strained diplomatic relations between
the UK and America over Boris Johnson’s refusal to ban Chinese tech
giant Huawei from building part of Britain’s 5G phone network, as well
as the US refusal to extradite Mrs Sacoolas.
In contrast, Home Secretary Priti Patel last week gave the green light
to extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful businessmen,
to face a US fraud case. Her decision opened up Tory divisions, with
former Cabinet Minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on
Sunday – on the facing page – to brand the US-UK extradition
arrangements ‘a bad treaty’.
The UK and US governments insist that, at the time of the accident, Mrs
Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity while her husband was working as
technical staffer at the Northamptonshire air base. The Foreign Office
confirmed that Mrs Sacoolas ‘was notified to us as a spouse with no
official role’ – but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed they knew
of her CIA history.
Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have vowed to
keep fighting to bring Mrs Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured left to
right:Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother),
Tracey Dunn and Bruce Charles
The US State Department declined to comment on our revelations
yesterday, saying only: ‘The driver was the spouse of an accredited
diplomat to the United Kingdom.’
In December the Crown Prosecution Service announced it was charging Mrs
Sacoolas over Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14
years in prison was ‘not proportionate’ for what was ‘a terrible but
unintentional accident’.
And last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to
the devastation of Harry’s family.
Last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry
However Ms Patel’s approval of the extradition of Mr Lynch has exposed
an imbalance in the US-UK extradition arrangements. Former Brexit
Secretary Mr Davis is furious that Ms Patel allowed the billionaire to
be extradited to face criminal charges in the US before a separate civil
fraud case against him in London’s High Court reaches its conclusion.
Mr Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy into a FTSE 100
heavyweight before it was sold to Hewlett-Packard in 2011 for £8.3
billion, handed himself over to police last week and was released on £10
million bail. He is accused of fraudulently inflating the value of
Autonomy before it was sold to HP, making him a fortune.
He denies the allegations and claims the American firm botched the takeover.
His lawyers have argued that the case should be heard in British courts,
not in America, because Mr Lynch is a British citizen who ran a British
company listed on the London Stock Exchange which was governed by
English law and UK accounting standards.
Mr Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, went with Mr Davis to meet Ms Patel at
the end of last month and pleaded with her to wait until the conclusion
of the High Court trial.
Writing in today’s Mail on Sunday, Mr Davis accuses Ms Patel of
‘spiriting’ Mr Lynch away to America before the verdict and says the
decision shows how the extradition treaty is skewed too heavily in
favour of America, while doing little to protect Britons.
‘When the US Department of Justice requests the extradition of a UK
citizen, we effectively have no choice but to cough them up,’ he writes.
But when UK authorities want to extradite an American ‘the US Secretary
of State “may” process the request. What the US “may” choose to do was
made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of
Harry Dunn’.
Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.
yeah what you say about deportation disparity seems right... that ufo
hacker had to rely on autism defence rather than reasonable-suspicion
defence...

me, I'd say attempting to hack yank secrets you'd better be pissraeli
eh! (or a lot better than he was)

then you could say "my alter-ego is russian-commie" those nasty russians
eh!
CheeseySock
2020-02-11 00:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by CheeseySock
Post by Keema's Nan
The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The
Mail on Sunday can reveal.
Fugitive mother-of-three Anne Sacoolas, who fled Britain after crashing
into the teenager’s motorbike outside an air base last August, is
understood to have served as a senior spy.
British Ministers and officials are aware of Mrs Sacoolas’s career in
espionage, but she was not declared as an agent when she came to the UK
alongside her intelligence officer husband Jonathan.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said that, following our revelation,
‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the US
government was blocking her extradition to face justice.
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas
family were able to flee in the days after the crash, but the US
government claim they notified the Foreign Office that they were
leaving.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain.
Mrs Sacoolas has been charged over the fatal accident outside RAF
Croughton and has apologised for 19-year-old Harry’s death, but is
refusing to return to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn
However Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have
vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.
Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs
Sacoolas’s CIA background, but the American government insist she was
not spying on Britain.
Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (pictured) said that, following our
revelation, ‘things are now beginning to fall into place’ as to why the
US government was blocking her extradition to face justice
US government sources said Mrs Sacoolas was ‘not active’ in the UK,
although a security source said: ‘You never really leave the CIA.’
One government source even claimed Mrs Sacoolas had been ‘more senior
than her husband’ in the US intelligence community.
Ms Charles told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Things are now
beginning to fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we could
not understand how anybody could just get on a plane after such a
catastrophic crash and leave a devastated family behind.
‘We have also found it impossible to figure out why the US
administration has behaved in the lawless way it has in harbouring Anne
Sacoolas. But no one is above the law. Whether or not you are a CIA
officer, a diplomat or anyone else, the Vienna Convention states that
you must abide by and respect the rules and regulations of the host
country.
‘Her leaving, and the US government protecting her and refusing the
extradition request, is nothing short of a disgrace and we will not
stand for it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will
not rest until she does.’
Mrs Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo is alleged to have been on the
wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr Dunn last summer.
Pictured: Mrs Sacoolas
Our revelation comes at a time of strained diplomatic relations between
the UK and America over Boris Johnson’s refusal to ban Chinese tech
giant Huawei from building part of Britain’s 5G phone network, as well
as the US refusal to extradite Mrs Sacoolas.
In contrast, Home Secretary Priti Patel last week gave the green light
to extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful businessmen,
to face a US fraud case. Her decision opened up Tory divisions, with
former Cabinet Minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on
Sunday – on the facing page – to brand the US-UK extradition
arrangements ‘a bad treaty’.
The UK and US governments insist that, at the time of the accident, Mrs
Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity while her husband was working as
technical staffer at the Northamptonshire air base. The Foreign Office
confirmed that Mrs Sacoolas ‘was notified to us as a spouse with no
official role’ – but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed they knew
of her CIA history.
Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover up’ and have vowed to
keep fighting to bring Mrs Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured left to
right:Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother),
Tracey Dunn and Bruce Charles
The US State Department declined to comment on our revelations
yesterday, saying only: ‘The driver was the spouse of an accredited
diplomat to the United Kingdom.’
In December the Crown Prosecution Service announced it was charging Mrs
Sacoolas over Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14
years in prison was ‘not proportionate’ for what was ‘a terrible but
unintentional accident’.
And last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to
the devastation of Harry’s family.
Last month the US government turned down an extradition request, to the
devastation of Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry
However Ms Patel’s approval of the extradition of Mr Lynch has exposed
an imbalance in the US-UK extradition arrangements. Former Brexit
Secretary Mr Davis is furious that Ms Patel allowed the billionaire to
be extradited to face criminal charges in the US before a separate
civil fraud case against him in London’s High Court reaches its
conclusion.
Mr Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy into a FTSE 100
heavyweight before it was sold to Hewlett-Packard in 2011 for £8.3
billion, handed himself over to police last week and was released on
£10 million bail. He is accused of fraudulently inflating the value of
Autonomy before it was sold to HP, making him a fortune.
He denies the allegations and claims the American firm botched the takeover.
His lawyers have argued that the case should be heard in British courts,
not in America, because Mr Lynch is a British citizen who ran a British
company listed on the London Stock Exchange which was governed by
English law and UK accounting standards.
Mr Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, went with Mr Davis to meet Ms Patel at
the end of last month and pleaded with her to wait until the conclusion
of the High Court trial.
Writing in today’s Mail on Sunday, Mr Davis accuses Ms Patel of
‘spiriting’ Mr Lynch away to America before the verdict and says the
decision shows how the extradition treaty is skewed too heavily in
favour of America, while doing little to protect Britons.
‘When the US Department of Justice requests the extradition of a UK
citizen, we effectively have no choice but to cough them up,’ he writes.
But when UK authorities want to extradite an American ‘the US Secretary
of State “may” process the request. What the US “may” choose to do was
made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of
Harry Dunn’.
Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.
yeah what you say about deportation disparity seems right... that ufo
hacker had to rely on autism defence rather than reasonable-suspicion
defence...
me, I'd say attempting to hack yank secrets you'd better be pissraeli
eh! (or a lot better than he was)
then you could say "my alter-ego is russian-commie" those nasty
russians eh!
on a tangent that sas bigwig got taken by a kikery laahhhhnnndun gambling
casino eh! had to move his troops/pieces on the board to his creditors
will eh!
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