Discussion:
Prescription prices
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Incubus
2018-12-06 09:35:04 UTC
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Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?

http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray

NHS prescription price: £8.80.

Private prescription price: £0.08.
abelard
2018-12-06 09:53:45 UTC
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On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
--
www.abelard.org
Col
2018-12-07 10:00:00 UTC
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Permalink
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
--
Col
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-12-07 10:23:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?

Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
abelard
2018-12-07 10:35:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...they just made me pay for your bus fares...
so i had to charge you in with my prices...
so you had to pay more for my products...

meanwhile it was fascist ever 'new' labour that introduced nhs charges
--
www.abelard.org
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-12-07 11:04:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.

On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.

You must try harder.
Post by abelard
they just made me pay for your bus fares...
so i had to charge you in with my prices...
so you had to pay more for my products...
meanwhile it was fascist ever 'new' labour that introduced nhs charges
abelard
2018-12-07 11:05:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 11:04:12 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
You must try harder.
Post by abelard
they just made me pay for your bus fares...
so i had to charge you in with my prices...
so you had to pay more for my products...
meanwhile it was fascist ever 'new' labour that introduced nhs charges
your dodging is not impressive
--
www.abelard.org
JNugent
2018-12-07 11:18:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan and
the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-12-07 11:26:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan and
the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Yes, and they started at 1 shilling per complete prescription.

The Tories then came to power and made the 1 shilling charge to count for
each individual item per prescription.

The Tories subsequently doubled the charge to 2 shillings.

Labour abolished all charges in 1965 as I stated, but then reintroduced
charges 3 years later.

I am not attempting to score political points; just correcting Lardy’s
comment.

I simply assumed all those with brains the size of Jupiter who post here
would have known the rest.
JNugent
2018-12-07 15:19:42 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan and
the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Yes, and they started at 1 shilling per complete prescription.
The Tories then came to power and made the 1 shilling charge to count for
each individual item per prescription.
The Tories subsequently doubled the charge to 2 shillings.
Labour abolished all charges in 1965 as I stated, but then reintroduced
charges 3 years later.
I am not attempting to score political points; just correcting Lardy’s
comment.
I simply assumed all those with brains the size of Jupiter who post here
would have known the rest.
Even 1965 is now a long time ago. Many children born in that year are
now grandparents.

1951 was a completely different world and hardly anyone today remembers it.
Farmer Giles
2018-12-07 14:59:56 UTC
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Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan and
the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Did the Tories then abolish them in the thirteen years they were in
power afterwards?
JNugent
2018-12-07 15:22:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan
and the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Did the Tories then abolish them in the thirteen years they were in
power afterwards?
They did not. Prescription charges (which have always been levied at
token amounts compared to the NHS drugs bill) are not a shibboleth for
the Conservatives, though they undoubtedly are that for Labour.
Conservative governments have traditionally seen prescription charges as
another revenue stream for the NHS and there's nothing wrong with that.
Farmer Giles
2018-12-07 15:33:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan
and the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Did the Tories then abolish them in the thirteen years they were in
power afterwards?
They did not. Prescription charges (which have always been levied at
token amounts compared to the NHS drugs bill) are not a shibboleth for
the Conservatives, though they undoubtedly are that for Labour.
Conservative governments have traditionally seen prescription charges as
another revenue stream for the NHS and there's nothing wrong with that.
No, they certainly did not. In fact the Labour Party only 'proposed'
prescription charges in 1951. They were actually introduced by the
Tories in 1952.
abelard
2018-12-07 16:40:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
They did not. Prescription charges (which have always been levied at
token amounts compared to the NHS drugs bill) are not a shibboleth for
the Conservatives, though they undoubtedly are that for Labour.
Conservative governments have traditionally seen prescription charges as
another revenue stream for the NHS and there's nothing wrong with that.
and as a mean of mitigating lefties abuse of the system
--
www.abelard.org
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-12-07 18:03:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
Post by JNugent
They did not. Prescription charges (which have always been levied at
token amounts compared to the NHS drugs bill) are not a shibboleth for
the Conservatives, though they undoubtedly are that for Labour.
Conservative governments have traditionally seen prescription charges as
another revenue stream for the NHS and there's nothing wrong with that.
and as a mean of mitigating lefties abuse of the system
Wriggle
abelard
2018-12-07 18:14:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 18:03:14 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
Post by JNugent
They did not. Prescription charges (which have always been levied at
token amounts compared to the NHS drugs bill) are not a shibboleth for
the Conservatives, though they undoubtedly are that for Labour.
Conservative governments have traditionally seen prescription charges as
another revenue stream for the NHS and there's nothing wrong with that.
and as a mean of mitigating lefties abuse of the system
Wriggle
i'm all for charging
--
www.abelard.org
Farmer Giles
2018-12-07 20:41:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan and
the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Would that be the 'little-known' Harold Wilson who was in the Cabinet at
the time?
JNugent
2018-12-07 23:52:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan
and the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Would that be the 'little-known' Harold Wilson who was in the Cabinet at
the time?
We are talking about 1951.

A time when most people, having no access to media beyond the BBC Light
Programme, the Pathé News at the cinema and whichever "news"paper they
bought (it might have been the Daily Mirror, for instance, with allthe
"news" that has ever carried) had no real idea of who was in the Cabinet
once the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer had been named.
Farmer Giles
2018-12-08 09:25:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan
and the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Would that be the 'little-known' Harold Wilson who was in the Cabinet
at the time?
We are talking about 1951.
A time when most people, having no access to media beyond the BBC Light
Programme, the Pathé News at the cinema and whichever "news"paper they
bought (it might have been the Daily Mirror, for instance, with allthe
"news" that has ever carried) had no real idea of who was in the Cabinet
once the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer had been named.
That may be partially true - I'm actually old enough to remember 1951,
although not terribly well as I was only five. However, when you refer
to someone as 'little-known' you need to qualify that a bit more. He may
not have been very well known to every 'man in the street', but he was
in political circles.

Having said that, I think people were more politically aware than you
might think. I remember going to various places with my parents and
pretty well everyone they ran into would make some comment about
politics and politicians.
Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
2018-12-08 10:43:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Farmer Giles
Post by JNugent
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by abelard
On Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:23:43 +0000, Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Fruitiest of Fruitcakes
Post by Col
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC), Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spr
ay
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
government wants your money...that is what government does
Typical bloody socialist Tories!
Yes, that is an amusing contradiction in political terms. If the
Tories are
so anti-taking money from the people, why do they not abolish
prescription
charges?
Oh wait, wasn’t that what the Labour Party used to do when in power?
no...
Yes.
On 1st February 1965, the Labour Part abolished prescription charges.
These would be the very same prescription charges which Labour had
introduced in 1951, precipitating the resignations of Aneurin Bevan
and the then little-known Harold Wilson.
Would that be the 'little-known' Harold Wilson who was in the Cabinet
at the time?
We are talking about 1951.
A time when most people, having no access to media beyond the BBC Light
Programme, the Pathé News at the cinema and whichever "news"paper they
bought (it might have been the Daily Mirror, for instance, with allthe
"news" that has ever carried) had no real idea of who was in the Cabinet
once the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer had been named.
That may be partially true - I'm actually old enough to remember 1951,
although not terribly well as I was only five. However, when you refer
to someone as 'little-known' you need to qualify that a bit more. He may
not have been very well known to every 'man in the street', but he was
in political circles.
Having said that, I think people were more politically aware than you
might think. I remember going to various places with my parents and
pretty well everyone they ran into would make some comment about
politics and politicians.
Yes, I remember my parents and relatives getting very worked up about the
Suez crisis later in the 1950s. I think that generation had grown up with
listening to serious political debate on the radio (there was the Home
Service - remember; not just the Light Programme) in the build up to, and
during, the war years.

Any political activity would have been the conversation of the day, after the
weather of course.

As a young kid, I had no idea what the Suez crisis was, or where it was; but
they talked about these things a lot.

Joe
2018-12-06 11:21:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 09:35:04 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
Yes, the NHS price is a fixed rate per item, regardless of what it is.
It's not quite free at the point of use, but nearly. People who are on
lots of medications long-term can buy season tickets. Some prescription
items will cost hundreds of pounds.

Reputable doctors and pharmacists will generally tell you if something
can be bought over the counter cheaper than the prescription price.
--
Joe
JNugent
2018-12-06 13:32:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
There is a third item for that list:

NHS prescription price (for me): £0.00.
Pamela
2018-12-06 15:05:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
The private prescription price looks like a typo to me. Perhaps it's the
price for an individual squirt as the description suggests. Dispensing
fees would be far more than 8p.

The BNF gives an NHS price of £1.75 (excluding VAT, wholesale, no handling
charges, etc) so it's hard to see the private price being less than that.

https://bnf.nice.org.uk/medicinal-forms/mometasone-furoate.html#PHP76128
Ophelia
2018-12-06 17:17:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"Incubus" wrote in message news:puaqg8$3m0$***@dont-email.me...

Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?

http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray

NHS prescription price: £8.80.

Private prescription price: £0.08.

==

Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
Incubus
2018-12-06 19:08:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.
Ophelia
2018-12-06 20:02:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.

==

Depends where you live:)) Some places are very beautiful:)
Incubus
2018-12-07 11:56:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.
==
Depends where you live:)) Some places are very beautiful:)
Indeed, the places with no human population are lovely ;)
Ophelia
2018-12-07 12:43:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.
==
Depends where you live:)) Some places are very beautiful:)
Indeed, the places with no human population are lovely ;)

==

lol I can't argue with that:))
g***@googlemail.com
2018-12-07 10:42:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.
:-)
Ophelia
2018-12-07 11:33:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
The downside is, I'd be living in Scotland.
:-)
==

Don't you start ... ;p
Ian Jackson
2018-12-06 19:45:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
--
Ian
Ophelia
2018-12-06 20:08:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!

Ian
==

Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.

And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting NHS
treatment .. free!

But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by Westminster ..
don't you???

In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here many
years ago with work.

O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
Ian Jackson
2018-12-06 20:39:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting NHS
treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by Westminster ..
don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here many
years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
--
Ian
Ophelia
2018-12-06 21:00:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting NHS
treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by Westminster ..
don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here many
years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.

Ian
==

Well since I am not in England and in charge of prescription charges, how
the heck am I supposed to know??
abelard
2018-12-06 23:35:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 20:39:05 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting NHS
treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by Westminster ..
don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here many
years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
because a pack of three aspirins is 8p
--
www.abelard.org
Ian Jackson
2018-12-07 09:38:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abelard
On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 20:39:05 +0000, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting NHS
treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by Westminster ..
don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here many
years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
because a pack of three aspirins is 8p
Up to a maximum of 32, you can simply buy up to 32 aspirins over the
counter (usually 2 300mg packets of 16). They don't need either a
private or an NHS prescription. I've never seen a 3-pack on sale. [The
only packets of 3 I ever see are for something quite different, and I'm
not sure how effective they are at curing headaches.] Packs of 16 cost
around 40p.

If you actually DID get 3 aspirins on prescription, and present it at a
pharmacist, he would probably have had to open a packet, and tear a
strip of three pills out of the foil (and sniggering with the other
staff, saying "We've got a right one here!").

I'm not sure what happens if you get them on prescription (when you can
get more than 32). I recently got a prescription for 100 paracetamol
(similar restrictions and about 50p for 16). These days, my NHS
prescriptions are free, but if I could have actually bought them, they
would have cost me just over £3. As a prescription, they would have cost
me £8.80. Although this seems iniquitous, I guess what you're mostly
paying for is the authorisation rather than the cost of the drugs. Also,
as the material cost of many prescriptions is more than £8.80, I suppose
it's a case of swings and roundabouts.
--
Ian
Pamela
2018-12-07 14:17:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-
nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting
NHS treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by
Westminster .. don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here
many years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
That advert looks like it has an error.
Ian Jackson
2018-12-07 16:27:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-
nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting
NHS treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by
Westminster .. don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here
many years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
That advert looks like it has an error.
No - it's probably correct. For a private prescription, the pharmacist
might charge you the price of the drugs, with no NHS charge.
--
Ian
Pamela
2018-12-07 18:01:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-
nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80. Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah! Move to Scotland. It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally
had to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian ==
Yes I have!!! Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are
getting NHS treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by
Westminster .. don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish! I came up here
many years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
That advert looks like it has an error.
No - it's probably correct. For a private prescription, the pharmacist
might charge you the price of the drugs, with no NHS charge.
I think the advert is almost certainly incorrect and I explained my
thinking here:

http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=154420562300
JNugent
2018-12-07 23:50:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-
nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
==
Pah!  Move to Scotland.  It is all 'free'!
So you don't pay for private health treatment? I have occasionally had
to, and I have to tell you it's bloody expensive!
Ian
==
Yes I have!!!   Well not for me, but the company I worked for.
And Yes, it was bloody expensive, but here, if you are you are getting
NHS treatment .. free!
But you do realise, Scotland is being subsidised heavily by
Westminster .. don't you???
In case you were wondering, no, I am not Scottish!  I came up here
many years ago with work.
O a proud Yorkshire lass!!!
But if private medicine IS bloody expensive, how does a private
prescription only cost 8p.
That advert looks like it has an error.
No - it's probably correct. For a private prescription, the pharmacist
might charge you the price of the drugs, with no NHS charge.
That has to be correct, with "the price" meaning whatever is equivalent
in the pharmaceuticals world to RRP.
Tim
2018-12-07 00:19:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/info/how-much-is-a-private-prescription
Ian Jackson
2018-12-07 09:37:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <pucea7$s4u$***@dont-email.me>, Tim <***@gatty.me.uk>
writes
Post by Tim
Post by Incubus
Can anyone explain the following discrepancy?
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/nasonex-50micrograms-dose-nasal-spray
NHS prescription price: £8.80.
Private prescription price: £0.08.
http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/info/how-much-is-a-private-prescription
That more-or-less says it all.
--
Ian
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