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Berlin selling out Ukraine for Russian gas
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Byker
2018-12-04 18:09:01 UTC
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"The West does not realise what it’s like to be a neighbour of Russia.”
Meanwhile, in Central Europe, “[W]e know exactly what price one pays for
being a neighbour of both Russia and Germany..."

Remember, Hitler made a deal with Russia and they were on his side until he
betrayed them...
---------------------------------------------------------------
Berlin ‘selling out Ukraine for gas’

30.11.2018

Berlin appears to be “selling out Ukraine for gas” in a move that may have
wider implications for the region, a Polish commentator has claimed.

The recent Russian seizure of Ukrainian ships has revived international
interest in a conflict that has been simmering since Moscow forcibly annexed
the Crimea peninsula from Ukraine in 2014, Marek Siudaj commented.

There are lessons to be learned and conclusions to be drawn from what has
happened to Ukraine, Siudaj said in an opinion piece.

He cited a spokesman for the German government as saying that Berlin
remained committed to the disputed Nord Stream 2 gas link being built from
Russia despite escalated tensions in Ukraine.

This position means that the Germans “want to be an intermediary in the sale
of Russian gas” and “do not care that Ukraine will be taken apart piece by
piece,” Siudaj argues in his piece, which was posted by the wgospodarce.pl
website.

After the Sea of Azov incident, in which Russia on Sunday seized three
Ukrainian navy ships, “hopes were voiced, even in the German media, that
Berlin would let go of Nord Stream 2,” Siudaj said.

But the latest reaction by Berlin shows that there should be “no illusions
that the construction of the gas pipeline is a political project” and that
“Russia will use it to increase its pressure on Central Europe,” he added.

“It is quite possible that the launch of the gas pipeline will be a signal
for an open invasion of Ukraine by Russia,” Siudaj claims.

Meanwhile, “German politicians do not care,” he asserts.

He also argues that Berlin is “selling out Ukraine for gas,” and that may
have “wider implications.”

“Above all, that means that soon the entire EU will turn its back on what is
happening in Ukraine,” focusing on the “problem of refugees in the
Mediterranean” instead, he writes.

“This will give Russia a chance to increase its possessions with the silent
approval of the entire German-dominated EU,” according to Siudaj.

It is “extremely naïve to think that Germany will change its position on the
gas pipeline because of what the Russians are doing in Ukraine,” he goes on.

“The German agreement on the gas pipeline has opened up the possibility for
the Russians to strike Ukraine,” he adds.

According to Siudaj, “Germany, much like other old EU members, treats
Central Europe as a subject of bargaining” with Russia.

“If they get a sufficiently good deal, they will sell out more countries,”
he opines.

“Besides, the West does not realise what it’s like to be a neighbour of
Russia,” Siudaj continues.

Meanwhile, in Central Europe, “we know exactly what price one pays for being
a neighbour of both Russia and Germany,” he says.

He asserts that most countries in Central Europe were “occupied by one of
these two countries” sometime in the past, and “some, like Poland,
experienced simultaneous occupation by both Russia and Germany.”

On the basis of this historical experience, Siudaj says, Poland should work
to develop the closest possible ties with other Central European countries.

Such cooperation is in Poland’s interest to fend off a domino effect,
according to Siudaj.

“If one of the countries in our region collapses, all of them will fall down
soon,” he argues.

He urges Central European countries to follow the principle of "one for all,
all for one," saying that the general rule is “the more, the merrier”
because sticking together “jacks up the price of potential invasion of
Central Europe from any possible side.”

He posits the view that it is in Poland’s interest to see Ukraine as well as
Belarus “survive.”

“The more efficient these countries are, the better,” he argues, adding that
ideally efforts should be made to get both Ukraine and Belarus on board and
involved in regional cooperation.

“Obviously, it’s much better to have a barrier separating us from Russia
than to lose such a barrier,” Siudaj concludes.

http://rlu.ru/2zQ29
Panthera Tigris Altaica
2018-12-04 18:19:03 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Byker
"The West does not realise what it’s like to be a neighbour of Russia.”
Meanwhile, in Central Europe, “[W]e know exactly what price one pays for
being a neighbour of both Russia and Germany..."
Remember, Hitler made a deal with Russia and they were on his side until he
betrayed them...
---------------------------------------------------------------
Berlin ‘selling out Ukraine for gas’
30.11.2018
Berlin appears to be “selling out Ukraine for gas” in a move that may have
wider implications for the region, a Polish commentator has claimed.
The recent Russian seizure of Ukrainian ships has revived international
interest in a conflict that has been simmering since Moscow forcibly annexed
the Crimea peninsula from Ukraine in 2014, Marek Siudaj commented.
There are lessons to be learned and conclusions to be drawn from what has
happened to Ukraine, Siudaj said in an opinion piece.
He cited a spokesman for the German government as saying that Berlin
remained committed to the disputed Nord Stream 2 gas link being built from
Russia despite escalated tensions in Ukraine.
This position means that the Germans “want to be an intermediary in the sale
of Russian gas” and “do not care that Ukraine will be taken apart piece by
piece,” Siudaj argues in his piece, which was posted by the wgospodarce.pl
website.
After the Sea of Azov incident, in which Russia on Sunday seized three
Ukrainian navy ships, “hopes were voiced, even in the German media, that
Berlin would let go of Nord Stream 2,” Siudaj said.
But the latest reaction by Berlin shows that there should be “no illusions
that the construction of the gas pipeline is a political project” and that
“Russia will use it to increase its pressure on Central Europe,” he added.
“It is quite possible that the launch of the gas pipeline will be a signal
for an open invasion of Ukraine by Russia,” Siudaj claims.
Meanwhile, “German politicians do not care,” he asserts.
He also argues that Berlin is “selling out Ukraine for gas,” and that may
have “wider implications.”
“Above all, that means that soon the entire EU will turn its back on what is
happening in Ukraine,” focusing on the “problem of refugees in the
Mediterranean” instead, he writes.
“This will give Russia a chance to increase its possessions with the silent
approval of the entire German-dominated EU,” according to Siudaj.
It is “extremely naïve to think that Germany will change its position on the
gas pipeline because of what the Russians are doing in Ukraine,” he goes on.
“The German agreement on the gas pipeline has opened up the possibility for
the Russians to strike Ukraine,” he adds.
According to Siudaj, “Germany, much like other old EU members, treats
Central Europe as a subject of bargaining” with Russia.
“If they get a sufficiently good deal, they will sell out more countries,”
he opines.
“Besides, the West does not realise what it’s like to be a neighbour of
Russia,” Siudaj continues.
Meanwhile, in Central Europe, “we know exactly what price one pays for being
a neighbour of both Russia and Germany,” he says.
He asserts that most countries in Central Europe were “occupied by one of
these two countries” sometime in the past, and “some, like Poland,
experienced simultaneous occupation by both Russia and Germany.”
On the basis of this historical experience, Siudaj says, Poland should work
to develop the closest possible ties with other Central European countries.
Such cooperation is in Poland’s interest to fend off a domino effect,
according to Siudaj.
“If one of the countries in our region collapses, all of them will fall down
soon,” he argues.
He urges Central European countries to follow the principle of "one for all,
all for one," saying that the general rule is “the more, the merrier”
because sticking together “jacks up the price of potential invasion of
Central Europe from any possible side.”
He posits the view that it is in Poland’s interest to see Ukraine as well as
Belarus “survive.”
“The more efficient these countries are, the better,” he argues, adding that
ideally efforts should be made to get both Ukraine and Belarus on board and
involved in regional cooperation.
“Obviously, it’s much better to have a barrier separating us from Russia
than to lose such a barrier,” Siudaj concludes.
http://rlu.ru/2zQ29
This surprises you... why? It's exactly what many predicted years ago.
Byker
2018-12-04 18:29:20 UTC
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Post by Panthera Tigris Altaica
It's exactly what many predicted years ago.
Some people have short memories...
Mr. B1ack
2018-12-04 22:11:29 UTC
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Berlin was one of the main players behind the
Ukraine coup - now it's screwing them. Funny !
Oleg Smirnov
2018-12-06 09:18:35 UTC
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Berlin appears to be "selling out Ukraine for gas" in a move that may
have wider implications for the region, a Polish commentator has
claimed.
Typical Ukrainian/Polish propaganda.
Building a direct pipeline to Russia doesn't mean we HAVE to buy gas
from them, it just means we CAN buy gas from them even though they cut
off the pipeline through Ukraine/Poland who often neglect to pay Russia
for the gas THEY buy from them.
American policymakers seem to pursue farther-reaching plans rather than
just providing the Ukraine with the gas transit benefits. Their strategic
goal would be to urge Europe to switch to the American LNG. They can not
achieve it as long as Russia pipes cheaper gas, whether it's transported
through the dilapidated Ukraine's pipelines or another way. But if gas
routes are limited to the Ukraine only, then, having at their disposal
the obedient puppet government in Kiev, the Americans, in fact, get full
control of the stopcock between Europe and Russia. And they will be able
to turn it off, under some suitable / plausible pretext.
Byker
2018-12-06 20:59:12 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
American policymakers seem to pursue farther-reaching plans rather than
just providing the Ukraine with the gas transit benefits. Their strategic
goal would be to urge Europe to switch to the American LNG. They can not
achieve it as long as Russia pipes cheaper gas, whether it's transported
through the dilapidated Ukraine's pipelines or another way. But if gas
routes are limited to the Ukraine only, then, having at their disposal the
obedient puppet government in Kiev, the Americans, in fact, get full
control of the stopcock between Europe and Russia. And they will be able
to turn it off, under some suitable / plausible pretext.
Don't think the Brits haven't considered what could happen if Putin turns
off the tap:

Pt. 1:


Pt. 2:


Dated, but still worth a watch...
Byker
2018-12-07 18:28:14 UTC
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I heard

Nah. Russkies just aren't used to absorbing nutrition in mass quantities:

https://www.datalounge.com/thread/18519048-russian-food-is-it-the-worst-food-in-the-world-
Oleg Smirnov
2018-12-07 22:56:36 UTC
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I heard http://youtu.be/dnfmAACfIQ8















Byker
2018-12-08 04:58:25 UTC
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I heard http://youtu.be/dnfmAACfIQ8
I understand Soviet troops acquired a taste for длинная свинья during the
Great Patriotic War:

Byker
2018-12-07 18:28:31 UTC
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Permalink
Building a direct pipeline to Russia doesn't mean we HAVE to buy gas
from them, it just means we CAN buy gas from them even though they cut
off the pipeline through Ukraine/Poland who often neglect to pay Russia
for the gas THEY buy from them.
Cutting off gas to Ukraine in the middle of a dead cold winter has a way
of encouraging sticking it to Russia in any way they can.
Cutting of services at the least convenient time also is a great way to
incourage payment for services delivered of course :-)
Or knee-jerk retribution in the case of Ukraine...
Oleg Smirnov
2018-12-08 22:53:18 UTC
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But Russia has a way of price gouging customers
that don't have alternative sources. Not exactly
an endearing tactic, and a short sighted one
as the customers start looking elsewhere as
soon as they can.
Even worse, Russia tends to try to use gas in the winter as a tool of
economic warfare to try to force their customers to take Russia's
side.
What tf "side"? Gazprom once stopped the supplies to the Ukraine, when
Kiev many times repeatedly violated the contract. Kiev, in turn, stole
the gas going to Europe, and the Atlanticist propaganda blamed Russia.

With regard to the Nord Stream route, such sitiations never happened, -
because Germany is a reliable counterparty in the business sense, and
there is no any intermediary between Germany and Russia in this route.

And that's why the US seeks, so desperately, to obtain control over the
stopcock between Russia and the reliable European customers, - it wants
to use it as a tool of economic warfare.

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