Discussion:
Yet Another Looming Brexit Disaster: cheaper beer ;-)
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A. Filip
2019-09-06 09:11:57 UTC
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Permalink
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)

https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-19573981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-off-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
--
A. Filip
| Solutions are obvious if one only has the optical power to observe
| them over the horizon. (K. A. Arsdall)
Ian Jackson
2019-09-06 10:04:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-19573981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like them,
and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.

20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.

But I've had a thought.

Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
--
Ian
Pamela
2019-09-06 15:26:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-1957
3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets.
[
]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like them,
and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
A. Filip
2019-09-06 15:40:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-1957
3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like them,
and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
It may+ turn out to be profitable: increased market share and reasonable
cost (indirectly paid) advertisement.

No risk means no big win. Is it "reasonable" risk? The future will judge.
--
A. Filip
| Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad.
| (Rob Pike)
Joe
2019-09-06 19:16:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 06 Sep 2019 16:40:57 +0100 (BST)
Post by A. Filip
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-1957
3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from
today 08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by
an average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union
on October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist
tariffs", which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and
supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer
free before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less,
and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
It may+ turn out to be profitable: increased market share and
reasonable cost (indirectly paid) advertisement.
No risk means no big win. Is it "reasonable" risk? The future will judge.
No point in going over the top, it's only Ruddles standard bitter at
the moment, not decent beers.
--
Joe
Keema's Nan
2019-09-07 07:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 06 Sep 2019 16:40:57 +0100 (BST)
Post by A. Filip
writes
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-1957
3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from
today 08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by
an average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union
on October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist
tariffs", which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and
supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer
free before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less,
and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
It may+ turn out to be profitable: increased market share and
reasonable cost (indirectly paid) advertisement.
No risk means no big win. Is it "reasonable" risk? The future will
judge.
No point in going over the top, it's only Ruddles standard bitter at
the moment, not decent beers.
Wetherspoons now have an app, where you order food/drinks at your table and
they bring them to you. Very useful if you have just found the ideal table
and don’t want to lose it, or you have small children in tow and they have
just sat down nicely.
Ian Jackson
2019-09-06 20:43:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-1957
3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets.
[…]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-o
ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like them,
and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way:
The customer pays the normal price, which presumably provides
Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For publicity, and as an
inducement to look favourably on this typical example of the benefits of
Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I know it's not a
fortune, but I'm sure there must be a name for this sort of activity.
--
Ian
Pamela
2019-09-07 09:44:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-
57 3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced. The firm -
which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an example of
how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs. The chain's
chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on October 31
would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs", which he
maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. [ ]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-
o ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For publicity,
and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical example of the
benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I know
it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must be a name for this sort of
activity.
Bribery?
A. Filip
2019-09-07 09:50:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-
57 3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced. The firm -
which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an example of
how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs. The chain's
chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on October 31
would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs", which he
maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-
o ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For publicity,
and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical example of the
benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I know
it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must be a name for this sort of
activity.
Bribery?
It fits as naming current Parliament activities begging (EU) :-)

It seems that EU loves to drag Brexit with best EU case scenario "no Brexit".
I am ready and willing to compare a few+ politicians to "useful EU idiots".
--
A. Filip
| Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
| (Martin Luther King, Jr.)
Sn!pe
2019-09-07 11:11:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-
57 3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced. The firm -
which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an example of
how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs. The chain's
chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on October 31
would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs", which he
maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. [ââ≠¬Âœ]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-
o ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For publicity,
and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical example of the
benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I know
it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must be a name for this sort of
activity.
Bribery?
It's a simple commercial promotion, the object being to get
more paying punters through the door. Its implication for
Brexit is incidental, even if it -is- dressed up as the primary
motivation.
--
^Ï^ My pet rock Gordon notes that
"Monsieur Barnier, il dit non."
Pamela
2019-09-07 13:04:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sn!pe
Post by Pamela
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-
57 3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from
today 08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by
an average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced. The
firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs. The
chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist
tariffs", which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and
supermarkets. [ââ≠¬Âœ]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-
o ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer
free before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less,
and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must
be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
It's a simple commercial promotion, the object being to get
more paying punters through the door. Its implication for
Brexit is incidental, even if it -is- dressed up as the primary
motivation.
I think that's a good summary.
A. Filip
2019-09-07 13:40:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[…]
Post by Pamela
Post by Sn!pe
Post by Pamela
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must
be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
It's a simple commercial promotion, the object being to get
more paying punters through the door. Its implication for
Brexit is incidental, even if it -is- dressed up as the primary
motivation.
I think that's a good summary.
Below is even better summary of business and politics mix:
"Who makes profit doing good earns double" :-)
--
A. Filip
| A fox is a wolf who sends flowers. (Ruth Weston)
JNugent
2019-09-07 14:21:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Pamela
Post by Ian Jackson
Post by A. Filip
Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)
https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-
57 3981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced. The firm -
which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an example of
how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs. The chain's
chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on October 31
would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs", which he
maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-
o ff-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
I rarely have the opportunity to visit Wetherspoon pubs, but like
them, and I reckon they are already pretty good value for money.
20p off a pint is very good news, but they will have to make beer free
before I'll be swayed to turn into a Brexit supporter.
But I've had a thought.
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for Brexit
in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays less, and
Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For publicity,
and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical example of the
benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I know
it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there must be a name for this sort of
activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
Joe
2019-09-07 15:38:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 15:21:05 +0100
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.

I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
--
Joe
JNugent
2019-09-07 22:53:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 15:21:05 +0100
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the human
capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.

Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value pubs?
They are well patronised all day long.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-08 07:59:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 15:21:05 +0100
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the human
capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value pubs?
They are well patronised all day long.
And the country would benefit greatly if the HoC was turned into a
Wetherspoons for us all.
Pamela
2019-09-08 08:34:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the human
capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value pubs?
They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed to
bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100 but that
does not make it good "value".
JNugent
2019-09-09 11:49:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the human
capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value pubs?
They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed to
bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100 but that
does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?

Why not?

*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.

On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made during
the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives made the
repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle.

They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked the
pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a variant
on "add £5 to the retail price and double your profits, because adding
the £5 won't put off buyers".
Pamela
2019-09-09 11:58:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed
to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100 but
that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value. You really don't
have a clue. For a moment I thought you were pretending to be thick.
Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you can study this.
Post by JNugent
On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made during
the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives made the
repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle. They should
have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked the pupils for
guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a variant on "add £5
to the retail price and double your profits, because adding the £5 won't
put off buyers".
Evasion noted. How much of the retail price do you honestly think accrues
to the manufacturer? You show no understanding of a supply chain.
Keema's Nan
2019-09-09 12:18:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed
to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100 but
that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value. You really don't
have a clue. For a moment I thought you were pretending to be thick.
Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you can study this.
If someone loves opera and considers £100 for a ticket to see their
favourite performance to be a small price to pay, who are you to decide that
is not good value?
Post by JNugent
On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made during
the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives made the
repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle. They should
have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked the pupils for
guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a variant on "add £5
to the retail price and double your profits, because adding the £5 won't
put off buyers".
Evasion noted. How much of the retail price do you honestly think accrues
to the manufacturer? You show no understanding of a supply chain.
Pamela
2019-09-09 12:52:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 15:21:05 +0100
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding
support for Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or
general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer
pays less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price,
which presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable
profit. For publicity, and as an inducement to look
favourably on this typical example of the benefits of
Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I
know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of
fingers to Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is
packed to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over
£100 but that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value. You really don't
have a clue. For a moment I thought you were pretending to be thick.
Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you can study this.
If someone loves opera and considers £100 for a ticket to see their
favourite performance to be a small price to pay, who are you to decide
that is not good value?
Willingness to pay for a scarce item does not make the price good value
for other people.

This discussion was started by Nugent's wonky logic that Wetherspoon's
prices are the best value because they are well patronised all day long.

One side of the discussion then tried to embrace the economist's different
definition of "value" and price paid in a free market. But it doesn't
apply here on account of the myriad of other factors drinkers use in
choosing where to drink.

Or maybe you think Weatherspoon's prices are the best value because it is
patronised all day long.
JNugent
2019-09-09 23:46:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by Keema's Nan
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 15:21:05 +0100
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding
support for Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or
general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer
pays less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price,
which presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable
profit. For publicity, and as an inducement to look
favourably on this typical example of the benefits of
Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the customer 20p back. I
know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of
fingers to Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is
packed to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over
£100 but that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value. You really don't
have a clue. For a moment I thought you were pretending to be thick.
Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you can study this.
If someone loves opera and considers £100 for a ticket to see their
favourite performance to be a small price to pay, who are you to decide
that is not good value?
Willingness to pay for a scarce item does not make the price good value
for other people.
It doesn't have to.

"Good value" is a completely subjective judgment.
Post by Pamela
This discussion was started by Nugent's wonky logic that Wetherspoon's
prices are the best value because they are well patronised all day long.
One side of the discussion then tried to embrace the economist's different
definition of "value" and price paid in a free market. But it doesn't
apply here on account of the myriad of other factors drinkers use in
choosing where to drink.
Or maybe you think Weatherspoon's prices are the best value because it is
patronised all day long.
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
Pamela
2019-09-10 08:29:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons. I
know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality of food on
offer, the attentive service, the old buildings Wetherspoons uses and the
location.

You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.

The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is incorrect for
you to claim (above) that it's price alone which constitutes value at
Wetherspoons.
Sn!pe
2019-09-10 09:43:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons. I
know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality of food on
offer, the attentive service, the old buildings Wetherspoons uses and the
location.
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is incorrect for
you to claim (above) that it's price alone which constitutes value at
Wetherspoons.
The beer is cheap because it's all short-dated stock that
the brewer is desperate to shift before it goes out of date.
You won't find a well-conditioned pint in a 'Spoons.
--
^Ï^ My pet rock Gordon notes that
"Monsieur Macron, il dit non."
JNugent
2019-09-10 10:34:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons. I
know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality of food on
offer, the attentive service, the old buildings Wetherspoons uses and the
location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who would
not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices beat the
lack of all that.
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is incorrect for
you to claim (above) that it's price alone which constitutes value at
Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
Pamela
2019-09-10 12:13:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons. I
know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality of
food on offer, the attentive service, the old buildings Wetherspoons
uses and the location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who would
not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices beat the
lack of all that.
Of course it all adds to the value. Your mistake was to focus on price alone
as determining the value obtained.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
The price was low enough as to be essentially insignificant compared to the
overall value my friend got from her occasional visits to Wetherspoons.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is incorrect
for you to claim (above) that it's price alone which constitutes value
at Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
The total value proposition does but not the price alone as you incorrectly
claimed.
JNugent
2019-09-10 13:58:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons. I
know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality of
food on offer, the attentive service, the old buildings Wetherspoons
uses and the location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who would
not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices beat the
lack of all that.
Of course it all adds to the value. Your mistake was to focus on price alone
as determining the value obtained.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
The price was low enough as to be essentially insignificant compared to the
overall value my friend got from her occasional visits to Wetherspoons.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is incorrect
for you to claim (above) that it's price alone which constitutes value
at Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
The total value proposition does but not the price alone as you incorrectly
claimed.
The price is the biggest attraction. Some other aspects of the
Wetherspoon offer appeal to some but not to others. But all the
customers like the prices.
Pamela
2019-09-10 18:34:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons.
I know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality
of food on offer, the attentive service, the old buildings
Wetherspoons uses and the location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who
would not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices
beat the lack of all that.
Of course it all adds to the value. Your mistake was to focus on price
alone as determining the value obtained.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
The price was low enough as to be essentially insignificant compared to
the overall value my friend got from her occasional visits to
Wetherspoons.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is
incorrect for you to claim (above) that it's price alone which
constitutes value at Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
The total value proposition does but not the price alone as you
incorrectly claimed.
The price is the biggest attraction.
That's not true for everybody as I explained in the case of my friend. I
have almost never chosen a wine bar or pub myself primarily on the basis
of price -- unless it is to avoid a hideously expensive establishment.

Certainly I have never been to a Wetherspoons primarily because some of
the beers on offer are particularly cheap. Maybe some students might do
that.

The value proposition offered by Wetherspoons is a mix of many factors.
Post by JNugent
Some other aspects of the Wetherspoon offer appeal to some but not to
others. But all the customers like the prices.
I couldn't care less about the prices in my local Wetherspoons. If I ever
go there it is for entirely different reasons and certainly not to save a
few shillings on short-dated beer.
JNugent
2019-09-11 13:46:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons.
I know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the quality
of food on offer, the attentive service, the old buildings
Wetherspoons uses and the location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who
would not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices
beat the lack of all that.
Of course it all adds to the value. Your mistake was to focus on price
alone as determining the value obtained.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
The price was low enough as to be essentially insignificant compared to
the overall value my friend got from her occasional visits to
Wetherspoons.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is
incorrect for you to claim (above) that it's price alone which
constitutes value at Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
The total value proposition does but not the price alone as you
incorrectly claimed.
The price is the biggest attraction.
That's not true for everybody as I explained in the case of my friend. I
have almost never chosen a wine bar or pub myself primarily on the basis
of price -- unless it is to avoid a hideously expensive establishment.
It doesn't have to be true for everybody. I can easily envisage some
liking the atmosphere and otherswanting to support the company in general.

But the prices at Wetherspoons are a major part of the chain's attraction.
Certainly I have never been to a Wetherspoons primarily because some of
the beers on offer are particularly cheap. Maybe some students might do
that.
A lot of very ordinary people like the prices. They certainly are not
full of students, especially those ones located in towns where there is
no higher education establishment.
The value proposition offered by Wetherspoons is a mix of many factors.
Indeed. And price is the biggest of them.
Post by JNugent
Some other aspects of the Wetherspoon offer appeal to some but not to
others. But all the customers like the prices.
I couldn't care less about the prices in my local Wetherspoons. If I ever
go there it is for entirely different reasons and certainly not to save a
few shillings on short-dated beer.
See above.

Are you a member of a CIU club, BTW?
Pamela
2019-09-13 09:06:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
At Wetherspoon's, it's the prices (ie, the good value) which attracts.
There are very many other reasons why customers go to Wetherspoons.
I know someone who particularly liked the lack of music, the
quality of food on offer, the attentive service, the old buildings
Wetherspoons uses and the location.
It all adds to the value for some customers. There are others who
would not mind music and noise in general, but for whom the prices
beat the lack of all that.
Of course it all adds to the value. Your mistake was to focus on
price alone as determining the value obtained.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
You could have charged them double the price and they would still go there.
Seems unlikely, but you know your own friends best.
The price was low enough as to be essentially insignificant compared
to the overall value my friend got from her occasional visits to
Wetherspoons.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
The value proposition is basic marketing economics and it is
incorrect for you to claim (above) that it's price alone which
constitutes value at Wetherspoons.
It's what gives the chain its incredible success.
The total value proposition does but not the price alone as you
incorrectly claimed.
The price is the biggest attraction.
That's not true for everybody as I explained in the case of my friend.
I have almost never chosen a wine bar or pub myself primarily on the
basis of price -- unless it is to avoid a hideously expensive
establishment.
It doesn't have to be true for everybody. I can easily envisage some
liking the atmosphere and otherswanting to support the company in general.
But the prices at Wetherspoons are a major part of the chain's
attraction.
Post by Pamela
Certainly I have never been to a Wetherspoons primarily because some of
the beers on offer are particularly cheap. Maybe some students might
do that.
A lot of very ordinary people like the prices. They certainly are not
full of students, especially those ones located in towns where there is
no higher education establishment.
Post by Pamela
The value proposition offered by Wetherspoons is a mix of many factors.
Indeed. And price is the biggest of them.
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Some other aspects of the Wetherspoon offer appeal to some but not to
others. But all the customers like the prices.
I couldn't care less about the prices in my local Wetherspoons. If I
ever go there it is for entirely different reasons and certainly not to
save a few shillings on short-dated beer.
See above.
Are you a member of a CIU club, BTW?
The value proposition at Wetherspoons is wide and involves many factors
such as lack of music, attentive service, atmospheric building, opening
hours, free wifi, etc.

Price is only one component and it is not the largest.

For example, I've never come across anyone who has a choice of pubs to
visit (say side by side on the high street) and chooses Wetherspoons
primarily because it is cheaper. Maybe hard drinking students would but
few others.

What proof do you have to support your claim that price is the *major*
attraction of Wetherspoons?
Joe
2019-09-13 09:55:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 13 Sep 2019 10:06:58 +0100
Post by Pamela
The value proposition at Wetherspoons is wide and involves many
factors such as lack of music, attentive service, atmospheric
building, opening hours, free wifi, etc.
Price is only one component and it is not the largest.
For example, I've never come across anyone who has a choice of pubs to
visit (say side by side on the high street) and chooses Wetherspoons
primarily because it is cheaper. Maybe hard drinking students would
but few others.
What proof do you have to support your claim that price is the
*major* attraction of Wetherspoons?
There is no proof available, nor proof to the contrary. But do you
realise how large the price difference is? Outside large cities, a pint
of good quality bitter in the typical pub is at least £3.50, and over
£4 in some of the more pretentious establishments. In a typical JDW,
it's around £2. That's an *enormous* difference, and there's no
possible doubt that Wetherspoons is still making a profit on that.

And it isn't old beer, either, at least not in any JDW I've ever
visited. The poster who said that should report his local JDW to head
office. I've only ever had one dodgy pint in over twenty years of
drinking in JDW, and that was replaced instantly without quibble.

You missed one of the most important features of (most) Wetherspoons
(the airport ones are rubbish), which is at least four or five very good
beers. There are many places people can meet, but the primary reason for
meeting in a pub is to drink beer of a kind and quality not available
anywhere else, and JDW sells by far the best beer in any location where
I've drunk.

Oh, yes, the coffee is cheaper there as well...
--
Joe
abelard
2019-09-13 10:31:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 13 Sep 2019 10:06:58 +0100
Post by Pamela
The value proposition at Wetherspoons is wide and involves many
factors such as lack of music, attentive service, atmospheric
building, opening hours, free wifi, etc.
Price is only one component and it is not the largest.
For example, I've never come across anyone who has a choice of pubs to
visit (say side by side on the high street) and chooses Wetherspoons
primarily because it is cheaper. Maybe hard drinking students would
but few others.
What proof do you have to support your claim that price is the
*major* attraction of Wetherspoons?
There is no proof available, nor proof to the contrary. But do you
realise how large the price difference is? Outside large cities, a pint
of good quality bitter in the typical pub is at least £3.50, and over
£4 in some of the more pretentious establishments. In a typical JDW,
it's around £2. That's an *enormous* difference, and there's no
possible doubt that Wetherspoons is still making a profit on that.
And it isn't old beer, either, at least not in any JDW I've ever
visited. The poster who said that should report his local JDW to head
office. I've only ever had one dodgy pint in over twenty years of
drinking in JDW, and that was replaced instantly without quibble.
You missed one of the most important features of (most) Wetherspoons
(the airport ones are rubbish), which is at least four or five very good
beers. There are many places people can meet, but the primary reason for
meeting in a pub is to drink beer of a kind and quality not available
anywhere else, and JDW sells by far the best beer in any location where
I've drunk.
Oh, yes, the coffee is cheaper there as well...
unfair to their competitors...

ban brexit
--
www.abelard.org
Pamela
2019-09-13 12:02:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 13 Sep 2019 10:06:58 +0100
Post by Pamela
The value proposition at Wetherspoons is wide and involves many
factors such as lack of music, attentive service, atmospheric
building, opening hours, free wifi, etc.
Price is only one component and it is not the largest.
For example, I've never come across anyone who has a choice of pubs to
visit (say side by side on the high street) and chooses Wetherspoons
primarily because it is cheaper. Maybe hard drinking students would
but few others.
What proof do you have to support your claim that price is the
*major* attraction of Wetherspoons?
There is no proof available, nor proof to the contrary. But do you
realise how large the price difference is? Outside large cities, a pint
of good quality bitter in the typical pub is at least £3.50, and over
£4 in some of the more pretentious establishments. In a typical JDW,
it's around £2. That's an *enormous* difference, and there's no
possible doubt that Wetherspoons is still making a profit on that.
And it isn't old beer, either, at least not in any JDW I've ever
visited. The poster who said that should report his local JDW to head
office. I've only ever had one dodgy pint in over twenty years of
drinking in JDW, and that was replaced instantly without quibble.
You missed one of the most important features of (most) Wetherspoons
(the airport ones are rubbish), which is at least four or five very good
beers. There are many places people can meet, but the primary reason for
meeting in a pub is to drink beer of a kind and quality not available
anywhere else, and JDW sells by far the best beer in any location where
I've drunk.
Oh, yes, the coffee is cheaper there as well...
Glad you mentioned the coffee because Wetherspoons appeal extends to far
more than hardened beer drinkers. In fact, there's usually an absence in
Wetherspoons of dishevelled alcoholics seeking oodles of cheap beer.

The non beer drinking Wetherspoons customer couldn't give a damn what the
beer costs. Indeed many beer drinkers choose not to have the heavily
discounted beer. As for the family groups and attendant kids, cheap beer
is not really a consideration.

I might add I'm more than familiar with Wetherspoons from when I used to
live in London and no Wetherspoons were to be found outside the South
East. Not once have I gone there because of the cheap beer -- which I
don't drink anyway. Nowadays Wetherspoons is closer to a continental cafe
mixed with the customer facilities found in a bookshop like Borders (if
you remember them, especially the Oxford Circus branch).

JNugent
2019-09-09 12:25:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support for
Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this typical
example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then gives the
customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm sure there
must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers to
Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed
to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100 but
that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value.
No-one said it does.

Your earlier concept used the phrase "good value" as an adjective (and
indeed, it is an adjectival phrase). Now you are using it as a noun. The
two uses are not in any way interchangeable.

As you suggest, putting up prices does not create value (that's the
noun). But even with an increase in price, something which is good value
(that's the adjective) - such as a £100 ticket to see an opera at the
ROH - can still be described as good value (adjective again). It all
depends on what it's worth to the customer. To show that a ticket at
£100 is not good value, you'd have to show that putting up the price by
a modest amount (say, £10) would result in a fall in ticket sales. Or
that reducing the price would increase sales. Good luck with either of
those.
Post by Pamela
You really don't
have a clue. For a moment I thought you were pretending to be thick.
Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you can study this.
It's both basic Economics and basic English Language which are failing
you here (as demonstrated above).
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made during
the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives made the
repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle. They should
have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked the pupils for
guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a variant on "add £5
to the retail price and double your profits, because adding the £5 won't
put off buyers".
Evasion noted. How much of the retail price do you honestly think accrues
to the manufacturer? You show no understanding of a supply chain.
Evasion? Evasion of what?

The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was of
no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only £5
per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the price
wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would - literally -
have doubled the profit on the Mini.
Pamela
2019-09-09 13:01:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support
for Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this
typical example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then
gives the customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm
sure there must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers
to Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed
to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100
but that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value.
No-one said it does.
Your earlier concept used the phrase "good value" as an adjective (and
indeed, it is an adjectival phrase). Now you are using it as a noun. The
two uses are not in any way interchangeable.
As you suggest, putting up prices does not create value (that's the
noun). But even with an increase in price, something which is good value
(that's the adjective) - such as a £100 ticket to see an opera at the
ROH - can still be described as good value (adjective again). It all
depends on what it's worth to the customer. To show that a ticket at
£100 is not good value, you'd have to show that putting up the price by
a modest amount (say, £10) would result in a fall in ticket sales. Or
that reducing the price would increase sales. Good luck with either of
those.
Post by Pamela
You really don't have a clue. For a moment I thought you were
pretending to be thick. Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you
can study this.
It's both basic Economics and basic English Language which are failing
you here (as demonstrated above).
"Value" and "good value" are nouns not adjectives. Talk of using pretzel
logic to arrive at a false conclusion.

Can you clearly state your imputed difference between value as a noun and
value as an adjective and still stay within the confines of the English
language?

Furthermore, you can not use price alone (as paid in a Wetherspoon's pub)
as a measure of economic value. There are very many other factors a
Wetherspoon's customer uses to determine value than price alone.

As I asked before, surely there's a GSCE economics text near you where you
can study this.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made
during the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives
made the repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle.
They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked
the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a
variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double your profits,
because adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
Evasion noted. How much of the retail price do you honestly think
accrues to the manufacturer? You show no understanding of a supply
chain.
Evasion? Evasion of what?
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was of
no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would - literally
- have doubled the profit on the Mini.
Not at BMC/BL, which is what you specifically said, but at the showroom.
You don't seem to understand even after I pointed it out to you once
already.
JNugent
2019-09-09 23:48:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
On 21:43 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
On 11:04 6 Sep 2019, Ian Jackson
Post by Ian Jackson
Is this just a cunning way of unaccountably funding support
for Brexit in any forthcoming referendum or general election?
How would that work? The beer is cheaper, the customer pays
less, and Wetherspoons has less money to spare.
Look at it this way: The customer pays the normal price, which
presumably provides Wetherspoon with a reasonable profit. For
publicity, and as an inducement to look favourably on this
typical example of the benefits of Brexit, Wetherspoon then
gives the customer 20p back. I know it's not a fortune, but I'm
sure there must be a name for this sort of activity.
Bribery?
"Business".
If it was business it would be the case all the time.
No; business is dependent on innovation all the time, such is the
human capacity for novelty.
Post by Joe
I think Tim Martin is just raising a pint and a couple of fingers
to Remainers.
That too.
Does anyone NEED to be told that Wetherspoon's are the best value
pubs? They are well patronised all day long.
Your logic is addled. By comparison, the Royal Opera House is packed
to bursting all season long where seats typically cost over £100
but that does not make it good "value".
Doesn't it?
Why not?
*If* there is unmet demand for seats at those prices, they are indeed
good value and the only sane conclusion is that they aren't priced
highly enough.
Demand created through scarcity does not create value.
No-one said it does.
Your earlier concept used the phrase "good value" as an adjective (and
indeed, it is an adjectival phrase). Now you are using it as a noun. The
two uses are not in any way interchangeable.
As you suggest, putting up prices does not create value (that's the
noun). But even with an increase in price, something which is good value
(that's the adjective) - such as a £100 ticket to see an opera at the
ROH - can still be described as good value (adjective again). It all
depends on what it's worth to the customer. To show that a ticket at
£100 is not good value, you'd have to show that putting up the price by
a modest amount (say, £10) would result in a fall in ticket sales. Or
that reducing the price would increase sales. Good luck with either of
those.
Post by Pamela
You really don't have a clue. For a moment I thought you were
pretending to be thick. Surey there's a GSCE economics text where you
can study this.
It's both basic Economics and basic English Language which are failing
you here (as demonstrated above).
"Value" and "good value" are nouns not adjectives. Talk of using pretzel
logic to arrive at a false conclusion.
"Value" is a noun.

"Good value" is a judgment and is purely adjectival.
Post by Pamela
Can you clearly state your imputed difference between value as a noun and
value as an adjective and still stay within the confines of the English
language?
See above.
Post by Pamela
Furthermore, you can not use price alone (as paid in a Wetherspoon's pub)
as a measure of economic value. There are very many other factors a
Wetherspoon's customer uses to determine value than price alone.
As I asked before, surely there's a GSCE economics text near you where you
can study this.
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
On a related note, I was watching a BBC doc a few days ago, made
during the 1980s, about the Mini. Several BMC/BL former executives
made the repeated point that the car made only £5 profit per vehicle.
They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked
the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a
variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double your profits,
because adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
Evasion noted. How much of the retail price do you honestly think
accrues to the manufacturer? You show no understanding of a supply
chain.
Evasion? Evasion of what?
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was of
no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would - literally
- have doubled the profit on the Mini.
Not at BMC/BL, which is what you specifically said, but at the showroom.
You don't seem to understand even after I pointed it out to you once
already.
BMC was talking about the wholseale price to the dealer (it's all they
*could* be talking about). They never received anything out of the
dealer's mark-up. That's how retail works.
Joe
2019-09-09 13:16:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 9 Sep 2019 13:25:27 +0100
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was
of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would -
literally - have doubled the profit on the Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying
its share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in manufacturing
is that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the minimum necessary
for a product to be considered commercially successful.

Ford, having at the time bought a Mini and examined it carefully,
reckoned that each one was sold at a loss...
--
Joe
JNugent
2019-09-09 23:53:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Mon, 9 Sep 2019 13:25:27 +0100
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was
of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would -
literally - have doubled the profit on the Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying
its share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in manufacturing
is that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the minimum necessary
for a product to be considered commercially successful.
Yes, I don't doubt that.

My "suggestion" of adding £5 to the wholesale price was aimed at
illustration of a point rather then as a careful analysis of BMC's
business model.
Post by Joe
Ford, having at the time bought a Mini and examined it carefully,
reckoned that each one was sold at a loss...
Ford seem to be doing alright.

Whatever DID happen to BMC? :-)
Pamela
2019-09-10 08:22:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was
of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would -
literally - have doubled the profit on the Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying its
share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in manufacturing is
that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the minimum necessary for a
product to be considered commercially successful.
Yes, I don't doubt that.
My "suggestion" of adding £5 to the wholesale price was aimed at
illustration of a point rather then as a careful analysis of BMC's
business model.
Your illustration was so poorly thought through that you claimed an
increase of £5 to the RETAIL PRICE would pass back to an increase in
BMC/BL PROFIT of £5. Here is what you wrote:

"Several BMC/BL former executives made the repeated point that the car
made only £5 profit per vehicle.

They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked
the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a
variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double your profits, because
adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
JNugent
2019-09-10 10:32:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was
of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was only
£5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding £5 to the
price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but would -
literally - have doubled the profit on the Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying its
share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in manufacturing is
that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the minimum necessary for a
product to be considered commercially successful.
Yes, I don't doubt that.
My "suggestion" of adding £5 to the wholesale price was aimed at
illustration of a point rather then as a careful analysis of BMC's
business model.
Your illustration was so poorly thought through that you claimed an
increase of £5 to the RETAIL PRICE would pass back to an increase in
"Several BMC/BL former executives made the repeated point that the car
made only £5 profit per vehicle.
They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and asked
the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the answer, a
variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double your profits, because
adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
It was obvious that I meant the sale price from manufacturer to dealer.
JNugent
2019-09-10 13:57:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer was
of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini was
concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production was
only £5 per car lower than the price realised in sales. Adding
£5 to the price wouyldn't have been noticed by the customer, but
would - literally - have doubled the profit on the Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying
its share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in
manufacturing is that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the
minimum necessary for a product to be considered commercially
successful.
Yes, I don't doubt that.
My "suggestion" of adding £5 to the wholesale price was aimed at
illustration of a point rather then as a careful analysis of BMC's
business model.
Your illustration was so poorly thought through that you claimed an
increase of £5 to the RETAIL PRICE would pass back to an increase in
"Several BMC/BL former executives made the repeated point that the
car made only £5 profit per vehicle.
They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and
asked the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the
answer, a variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double your
profits, because adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
It was obvious that I meant the sale price from manufacturer to dealer.
I am glad you finally admit your error although if it was that obvious then
why did you write the opposite in the first place and then repeatedly argue
it was correct?
because I hadn't noticed the error.

Nowe that I have, I am happy to correct it.

It wasn't mch of an error, though. The real underlying point is that the
ex-works price of the Mini was quite a way too low, and certainly not by
just £5.

But then, good management at BMC was not something which could relied
upon, as neither was reasonable response by the trade unions
"representing" the workforce.

Where did it get them in the end?
It's one thing to make a stupid mastake but another to refuse to correct it
despite several requests.
"several requests"?
Pamela
2019-09-10 18:29:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JNugent
Post by JNugent
Post by Pamela
Post by JNugent
Post by Joe
Post by JNugent
The proportion of the retail price accruing to the manufacturer
was of no consequence. What was important was that where the Mini
was concerned, and at the time spoken of, the cost of production
was only £5 per car lower than the price realised in sales.
Adding £5 to the price wouyldn't have been noticed by the
customer, but would - literally - have doubled the profit on the
Mini.
To something still negligible, from the point of view of defraying
its share of BMC's overheads. The usual rule of thumb in
manufacturing is that a gross profit margin of around 30% is the
minimum necessary for a product to be considered commercially
successful.
Yes, I don't doubt that.
My "suggestion" of adding £5 to the wholesale price was aimed at
illustration of a point rather then as a careful analysis of BMC's
business model.
Your illustration was so poorly thought through that you claimed an
increase of £5 to the RETAIL PRICE would pass back to an increase in
"Several BMC/BL former executives made the repeated point that
the car made only £5 profit per vehicle.
They should have gone to the local secondary modern school and
asked the pupils for guidance. They would quickly have had the
answer, a variant on "add £5 to the retail price and double
your profits, because adding the £5 won't put off buyers".
It was obvious that I meant the sale price from manufacturer to dealer.
I am glad you finally admit your error although if it was that obvious
then why did you write the opposite in the first place and then
repeatedly argue it was correct?
because I hadn't noticed the error.
Nowe that I have, I am happy to correct it.
You wasted countless electrons by your unnecessary resistance to my
correction when I first made it.
Post by JNugent
It wasn't mch of an error, though. The real underlying point is that the
ex-works price of the Mini was quite a way too low, and certainly not by
just £5.
But then, good management at BMC was not something which could relied
upon, as neither was reasonable response by the trade unions
"representing" the workforce.
Where did it get them in the end?
It's one thing to make a stupid mastake but another to refuse to
correct it despite several requests.
"several requests"?
Byker
2019-09-07 20:34:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"A. Filip" wrote in message news:anfi+ljh0ew7wvf-***@wp.eu...

Britain will never ever survive cheaper beer! ;-)

https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/breaking-wetherspoons-cuts-price-pint-19573981
Wetherspoons cuts price of pint of beer by average of 20p from today
08:06, 6 SEP 2019Updated08:58, 6 SEP 2019
The price of a pint of beer in Wetherspoon pubs is being cut by an
average of 20p from Friday, the company has announced.
The firm - which is an ardent supporter of Brexit - says it is an
example of how leaving the Customs Union can reduce costs.
The chain's chairman, Tim Martin, said leaving the customs union on
October 31 would allow the Government to end "protectionist tariffs",
which he maintained would reduce prices in pubs and supermarkets. […]
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit/9874445/wetherspoons-to-slash-20p-off-a-pint-to-show-how-brexit-will-help-cut-costs/
Will there be a stampede to the pubs? I became aware of the Russian craving
for alcohol when I read how 1.400 people were trampled to death during a mad
rush for free beer at Czar Nicholas II's coronation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khodynka_Tragedy
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