Discussion:
Voter registration soaring - mostly the young
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Stephen Cole
2019-09-05 09:04:48 UTC
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Permalink
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.

Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Norman Wells
2019-09-05 09:38:26 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young ones
replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as we
grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities, we
become more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point in
the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to acknowledge.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.

Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
nightjar
2019-09-05 11:42:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young.  It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one.  The young ones
replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water.  We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as we
grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities, we
become more realistic and conservative.  There's a crossover point in
the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more right
leaning among the old, but not all change, while those who start out
centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum. He knows
that he probably wouldn't win another referendum, but thinks he could
win a general election (although a hung parliament seems more likely).
If he won he could then claim to have a mandate to leave without a deal.
--
Colin Bignell
Norman Wells
2019-09-05 13:28:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young.  It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one.  The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water.  We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as
we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities,
we become more realistic and conservative.  There's a crossover point
in the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to
acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more right
leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though. The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and
70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in
mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
Post by nightjar
while those who start out
centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum.
It's rather the other way round. A referendum would be a substitute for
a general election. But a general election is what we currently need
because we have a government that is being prevented by Parliament from
governing. And that has to be resolved.
Post by nightjar
He knows that he probably wouldn't win another referendum,
He doesn't have to. We've had the one that mattered.
Post by nightjar
but thinks he could win a general election
Well, that's better surely than Corbyn who is running scared of one.
Post by nightjar
(although a hung parliament seems more likely).
If he won he could then claim to have a mandate to leave without a deal.
Good.
Andrew
2019-09-05 13:57:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young.  It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one.  The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water.  We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but
as we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and
responsibilities, we become more realistic and conservative.  There's
a crossover point in the demographic which all these simplistic
arguments fail to acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more
right leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though.  The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
 That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and
70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in
mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
Lots of well-heeled baby boomers are retiring(ed) with pensions of
more average earnings (78,000 at last count). These people, including
the guardian readers are the ones with 2nd homes, BTLs and even the
guardian readers are going to have a dilema in the voting booth.
Roger Hayter
2019-09-05 19:07:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the "natural wastage" of
older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as
we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities,
we become more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point
in the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to
acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more right
leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though. The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and
70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in
mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
A common fallacy. First a minor point. The hippies in general were
tolerant of personal choices but not particularly left wing in other
respects. But the major point is that all the left wing students, while
being of interest to their parents in the media, were a small minority
of the population. The great bulk of youth spent the sixties beating up
pakistanis and homosexuals and gradually moving from beer to lager for
their main recreational activities. I doubt if progressive/left wing
youth accounted for 10% and certainly not 20% of our generation. Even
among students left wing, right wing and not interested in politics were
groups of approximately equal size. The oft remarked permissivenes was
not in any since linked to socio-economic beliefs.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
while those who start out
centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris' goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum.
It's rather the other way round. A referendum would be a substitute for
a general election. But a general election is what we currently need
because we have a government that is being prevented by Parliament from
governing. And that has to be resolved.
Post by nightjar
He knows that he probably wouldn't win another referendum,
He doesn't have to. We've had the one that mattered.
Post by nightjar
but thinks he could win a general election
Well, that's better surely than Corbyn who is running scared of one.
Post by nightjar
(although a hung parliament seems more likely).
If he won he could then claim to have a mandate to leave without a deal.
Good.
--
Roger Hayter
Norman Wells
2019-09-05 21:19:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Hayter
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the "natural wastage" of
older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as
we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities,
we become more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point
in the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to
acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more right
leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though. The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and
70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in
mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
A common fallacy. First a minor point. The hippies in general were
tolerant of personal choices but not particularly left wing in other
respects. But the major point is that all the left wing students, while
being of interest to their parents in the media, were a small minority
of the population. The great bulk of youth spent the sixties beating up
pakistanis and homosexuals and gradually moving from beer to lager for
their main recreational activities. I doubt if progressive/left wing
youth accounted for 10% and certainly not 20% of our generation. Even
among students left wing, right wing and not interested in politics were
groups of approximately equal size. The oft remarked permissivenes was
not in any since linked to socio-economic beliefs.
So you say. But you're wrong.
Rod Speed
2019-09-05 21:45:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young ones
replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as we
grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities, we
become more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point in
the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to
acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more right
leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though. The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and 70s, of
which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in mid-life and
become the Tory voters of today.
Its more complicated than that, particularly given that Blair
put one hell of a bomb under Labour and wasn’t lefty at all.

And given that Labour only had a single term at a time before Blair.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
while those who start out centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum.
It's rather the other way round. A referendum would be a substitute for a
general election. But a general election is what we currently need
because we have a government that is being prevented by Parliament from
governing. And that has to be resolved.
That could be resolved by a second referendum with a majority to remain.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
He knows that he probably wouldn't win another referendum,
He doesn't have to. We've had the one that mattered.
Post by nightjar
but thinks he could win a general election
Well, that's better surely than Corbyn who is running scared of one.
Post by nightjar
(although a hung parliament seems more likely). If he won he could then
claim to have a mandate to leave without a deal.
Good.
Peeler
2019-09-05 21:57:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 07:45:11 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
Its more complicated than that
Is it, you auto-contradicting senile asshole from Oz?
--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 85-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/
Norman Wells
2019-09-05 22:29:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rod Speed
Post by nightjar
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young.  It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one.  The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water.  We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but
as we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and
responsibilities, we become more realistic and conservative.
There's a crossover point in the demographic which all these
simplistic arguments fail to acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more
right leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though.  The evidence is that we have a Conservative
government. That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the
1960s and 70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the
cause in mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
Its more complicated than that, particularly given that Blair
put one hell of a bomb under Labour and wasn’t lefty at all.
It's got nothing to do with Blair. It's to do with the natural
progression of people through their lifetimes.
Post by Rod Speed
And given that Labour only had a single term at a time before Blair.
Post by nightjar
while those who start out centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum.
It's rather the other way round.  A referendum would be a substitute
for a general election.  But a general election is what we currently
need because we have a government that is being prevented by
Parliament from governing.  And that has to be resolved.
That could be resolved by a second referendum with a majority to remain.
No, it couldn't. Boris's administration is a minority one. It is being
prevented by others in Parliament from dong what it was elected to do,
ie govern.

What is rquwired is a general election. A further referendum would not
give Boris or anyone else the authority and power it needs to govern.
Rod Speed
2019-09-06 00:02:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Rod Speed
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It
follows from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young
ones replace the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election
will be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning
than even in GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural
wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold
any water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as
we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities,
we become more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point
in the demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to
acknowledge.
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more
right leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though. The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and 70s,
of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in mid-life
and become the Tory voters of today.
Its more complicated than that, particularly given that Blair
put one hell of a bomb under Labour and wasn’t lefty at all.
It's got nothing to do with Blair. It's to do with the natural
progression of people through their lifetimes.
That can't explain why Labour has only ever managed single
terms until Blair showed up.

Or why there is a completely different result in France.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Rod Speed
And given that Labour only had a single term at a time before Blair.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
while those who start out centerist tend to stay there all their life.
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
More like he isn't going to be drawn into Boris' game of trying to
present a general election as a substitute for a referendum.
It's rather the other way round. A referendum would be a substitute for
a general election. But a general election is what we currently need
because we have a government that is being prevented by Parliament from
governing. And that has to be resolved.
That could be resolved by a second referendum with a majority to remain.
No, it couldn't.
Of course it could because then parliament would be able
to carry on regardless and do what the chancellor has just
announced except for how it would be paid for.
Post by Norman Wells
Boris's administration is a minority one. It is being prevented by others
in Parliament from dong what it was elected to do, ie govern.
Only on the brexit question.
Post by Norman Wells
What is rquwired is a general election. A further referendum would not
give Boris or anyone else the authority and power it needs to govern.
But if it got a majority remain, the current parliament is unlikely to have
any problem with what else the current govt wants to do to govern.

Plenty of govts work fine without a parliamentary majority, by implementing
policys that some of the non govt members are prepared to vote for.

I bet the current parliament would have no problem with doing all the
stuff that the chancellor has just announced the govt will be doing.

The only real exception might be preparations for a no deal brexit.
Peeler
2019-09-06 08:23:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 10:02:14 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
The only real exception might be preparations for a no deal brexit.
Yeah, senile Rodent, KEEP teaching those dumb Brits about how things REALLY
are in Britain! Good heavens ...what a pathological Australian asshole you
are!
--
FredXX to Rot Speed:
"You are still an idiot and an embarrassment to your country. No wonder
we shipped the likes of you out of the British Isles. Perhaps stupidity
and criminality is inherited after all?"
Message-ID: <plbf76$gfl$***@dont-email.me>
nightjar
2019-09-06 08:28:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...
Post by nightjar
Not entirely. There are more left leaning among the young and more
right leaning among the old, but not all change,
Most do though.  The evidence is that we have a Conservative government.
 That would be impossible if all the young lefties in the 1960s and
70s, of which there were vast numbers, hadn't abandoned the cause in
mid-life and become the Tory voters of today.
A recent study showed that, while the right wing leanings come with age
theory is true to some extent, it has also been found that there is a
generational effect as well. Not every generation starts from the same
base line and the current trend is for successive generations to start
off more left wing than their predecessors. That means that, while
members of that generation may well move to the right as they age, they
probably won't end up as far right as the generation before them. The
crossover point is not fixed.

...
It's rather the other way round.  A referendum would be a substitute for
a general election.  But a general election is what we currently need
because we have a government that is being prevented by Parliament from
governing.  And that has to be resolved.
That is entirely down to Boris. It was his insistence on a no deal
Brexit that lead a number of Conservative MPs, his brother included, to
put the national interest before their own careers. He single handedly
lost the government's working majority and, having lost control, nobody
trusts him enough to give it back.
Post by nightjar
He knows that he probably wouldn't win another referendum,
He doesn't have to.  We've had the one that mattered.
Aside from the fact that the evidence is that public opinion now favours
remain over leave, that referendum only gave the government a mandate to
leave the EU. It did not give it a mandate to leave in the most damaging
way possible. People have a right to the sort of Brexit that the Leave
campaign described, which is not what they would get with a no deal
Brexit. If Boris wants to be able to claim that the people back a no
deal Brexit, he can only do so if he gets a clear mandate for that
option in another referendum.
Post by nightjar
but thinks he could win a general election
Well, that's better surely than Corbyn who is running scared of one.
He isn't running scared. he simply isn't going to dance to Boris' tune.
Labour has already said it is quite willing to support a general
election in mid-November.
--
Colin Bignell
Norman Wells
2019-09-06 10:46:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
It's rather the other way round.  A referendum would be a substitute
for a general election.  But a general election is what we currently
need because we have a government that is being prevented by
Parliament from governing.  And that has to be resolved.
That is entirely down to Boris. It was his insistence on a no deal
Brexit that lead a number of Conservative MPs, his brother included, to
put the national interest before their own careers. He single handedly
lost the government's working majority and, having lost control, nobody
trusts him enough to give it back.
But actually he hasn't insisted on a no deal Brexit. If he had, Farage
would not be saying at his conference that he will fight the
Conservatives in every seat in the land.

What Boris has done is insist on no deal being an option. He at least
appreciates the first rule of Negotiation 101 that you have to be
prepared to walk away with no deal rather than a bad deal.
Post by nightjar
Post by nightjar
He knows that he probably wouldn't win another referendum,
He doesn't have to.  We've had the one that mattered.
Aside from the fact that the evidence is that public opinion now favours
remain over leave, that referendum only gave the government a mandate to
leave the EU. It did not give it a mandate to leave in the most damaging
way possible.
It gave the government a mandate to leave the EU in the way the
government saw fit. The referendum set the direction and handed the
matter back to the government to implement.
Post by nightjar
People have a right to the sort of Brexit that the Leave
campaign described, which is not what they would get with a no deal
Brexit.
The people were not going to be consulted after the referendum. That
much was made very clear. 'The government will implement what you
decide' said the leaflet that came thudding through our letterboxes.
And it was supposed to be a 'once in a generation' opportunity for the
people to decide.

Besides, there are many who say the original question was too difficult
for voters to understand. Heaven alone knows how the public are
supposed to understand all the nuances of the different sorts of Brexit
there might be.
Post by nightjar
If Boris wants to be able to claim that the people back a no
deal Brexit, he can only do so if he gets a clear mandate for that
option in another referendum.
Post by nightjar
but thinks he could win a general election
Well, that's better surely than Corbyn who is running scared of one.
He isn't running scared. he simply isn't going to dance to Boris' tune.
Labour has already said it is quite willing to support a general
election in mid-November.
Never before in history has an opposition party spurned a chance to have
an election that could see them elected to power. It's supposed to be
what they want.

There's no getting away from it. Corbyn was unequivocal about wanting
an election and being ready for one just four days ago:

"When a government finds itself without a majority, the solution is not
to undermine dedmocracy. The solution is to let the people decide and
call a general election. It is the people, not an unelected Prime
Minister, who should determine our country's future. An election is the
democratic way forward."



(from 3:02 in)

Now that one has been offered, it turns out he didn't really mean it at all.

He's running scared and denying the 'democratic way forward' he so nobly
espoused so little time ago.
nightjar
2019-09-07 08:16:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
That is entirely down to Boris. It was his insistence on a no deal
Brexit that lead a number of Conservative MPs, his brother included,
to put the national interest before their own careers. He single
handedly lost the government's working majority and, having lost
control, nobody trusts him enough to give it back.
But actually he hasn't insisted on a no deal Brexit.
He has said he would have the UK leave on 31st October, deal or no deal.
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal and has suspended
parliament, so there wouldn't be enough time to debate it if he did. His
intentions couldn't be more clear if they were written in 10 foot high
letters across the front of the Palace of Westminster.
Post by Norman Wells
If he had, Farage
would not be saying at his conference that he will fight the
Conservatives in every seat in the land....
That is just Nigel throwing his toys out of the pram, because he isn't
getting the media attention he thinks he deserves. If it were about
Brexit, rather than about Nigel wanting to feel important, he would say
that The Brexit party would not be putting up any candidates in a
general election and urging anybody who would have voted for them to
vote Conservative.

David Cameron didn't call the referendum because he thought that UKIP
would ever be a serious force in parliament. He called it because he
thought they could take enough votes from the Conservatives to lose them
a general election. The same applies now with TBP. If Boris is going to
be the one to take the UK out of the EU, he needs to win Labour marginal
seats in Leave voting areas. At Peterborough, the Brexit party took
Leave voters from Labour, but far more from the Conservatives, with the
result that Labour won. Had TBP supporters voted Conservative, it would
have been a decisive Conservative win. The same is likely to happen in
any Labour marginal in any Leave area.

...
Post by Norman Wells
There's no getting away from it.  Corbyn was unequivocal about wanting
...
Post by Norman Wells
Now that one has been offered, it turns out he didn't really mean it at all.
He's running scared and denying the 'democratic way forward' he so nobly
espoused so little time ago.
As I said, Labour is more than willing to have a general election, but
when it suits them, in November, not when it suits Boris.
--
Colin Bignell
Rod Speed
2019-09-07 09:09:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
...
Post by Norman Wells
Post by nightjar
That is entirely down to Boris. It was his insistence on a no deal
Brexit that lead a number of Conservative MPs, his brother included, to
put the national interest before their own careers. He single handedly
lost the government's working majority and, having lost control, nobody
trusts him enough to give it back.
But actually he hasn't insisted on a no deal Brexit.
He has said he would have the UK leave on 31st October, deal or no deal.
Yes, to put a bomb under Barnier.
Post by nightjar
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal
That’s a bare faced lie.
Post by nightjar
and has suspended parliament,
Must be why we saw the shit fight last week.
Post by nightjar
so there wouldn't be enough time to debate it if he did.
Another bare faced remoaner lie.
Post by nightjar
His intentions couldn't be more clear if they were written in 10 foot high
letters across the front of the Palace of Westminster.
Even more flagrantly dishonest than you
usually manage and that’s saying something.
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
If he had, Farage would not be saying at his conference that he will
fight the Conservatives in every seat in the land....
That is just Nigel throwing his toys out of the pram, because he isn't
getting the media attention he thinks he deserves.
Even more flagrantly dishonest than you
usually manage and that’s saying something.
Post by nightjar
If it were about Brexit, rather than about Nigel wanting to feel
important, he would say that The Brexit party would not be putting up any
candidates in a general election and urging anybody who would have voted
for them to vote Conservative.
Even more sillier than you usually
manage and that’s saying something.
Post by nightjar
David Cameron didn't call the referendum because he thought that UKIP
would ever be a serious force in parliament. He called it because he
thought they could take enough votes from the Conservatives to lose them a
general election.
Nope, he had the referendum stupidly assuming that it would
produce a result that would shut up the Tory brexiteers.
Post by nightjar
The same applies now with TBP. If Boris is going to be the one to take the
UK out of the EU, he needs to win Labour marginal seats in Leave voting
areas.
BULLSHIT given the Labour poll results.
Post by nightjar
At Peterborough, the Brexit party took Leave voters from Labour, but far
more from the Conservatives, with the result that Labour won.
One seat proves nothing, stupid.
Post by nightjar
Had TBP supporters voted Conservative, it would have been a decisive
Conservative win. The same is likely to happen in any Labour marginal in
any Leave area.
Even more sillier than you usually
manage and that’s saying something.
Post by nightjar
Post by Norman Wells
There's no getting away from it. Corbyn was unequivocal about wanting an
Now that one has been offered, it turns out he didn't really mean it at all.
He's running scared and denying the 'democratic way forward' he so nobly
espoused so little time ago.
As I said, Labour is more than willing to have a general election, but
when it suits them, in November, not when it suits Boris.
We'll see...
Peeler
2019-09-07 10:52:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 7 Sep 2019 19:09:31 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
Yes, to put a bomb under Barnier.
Barnier? That's a European. So, NONE of yours, senile Ozzie pest!
Post by Rod Speed
We'll see...
We'll see you trolling in all these groups like there was no tomorrow, you
85-year-old trolling senile pest!
--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 85-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/
nightjar
2019-09-08 08:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...
Post by nightjar
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal
That’s a bare faced lie...
Ask Amber Rudd.
--
Colin Bignell
abelard
2019-09-08 10:34:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
...
Post by nightjar
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal
That’s a bare faced lie...
Ask Amber Rudd.
get as much sense out of agent cob and dinah
--
www.abelard.org
The Natural Philosopher
2019-09-08 10:54:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
...
Post by nightjar
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal
That’s a bare faced lie...
Ask Amber Rudd.
And you WILL get a barefaced lie.
That smells of fish.
--
“It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established
authorities are wrong.”

― Voltaire, The Age of Louis XIV
Rod Speed
2019-09-08 19:57:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by nightjar
...
Post by nightjar
He has made no serious moves to negotiate a deal
That’s a bare faced lie...
Ask Amber Rudd.
She's no authority on that. We know what he has setup
meetings wise in the time between now and 29-Oct
because the EU has spelt that out.
Peeler
2019-09-08 20:17:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 9 Sep 2019 05:57:33 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
Post by nightjar
Ask Amber Rudd.
She's no authority on that.
She certainly is no trolling asshole like you. Come to think of it, even
Boris isn't, although he comes very close to being one!
--
***@down.the.farm about senile Rot Speed:
"This is like having a conversation with someone with brain damage."
MID: <ps10v9$uo2$***@gioia.aioe.org>
Joe
2019-09-06 13:35:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 09:28:15 +0100
Post by nightjar
A recent study showed that, while the right wing leanings come with
age theory is true to some extent, it has also been found that there
is a generational effect as well. Not every generation starts from
the same base line and the current trend is for successive
generations to start off more left wing than their predecessors. That
means that, while members of that generation may well move to the
right as they age, they probably won't end up as far right as the
generation before them. The crossover point is not fixed.
It is also the case that political bias and Political Correctness in
education has steadily increased with time (Long March Through the
Institutions, Common Purpose, the EU
(https://ec.europa.eu/unitedkingdom/education/eu-teaching-materials_en)
etc.)

After a year or two out of education, the more intelligent ones will
see that and many will be quite annoyed about it. Also, my generation
pushed back against mainly Right-wing parents, but today's generation
have more Left-wing parents.

So it could just as easily go the other way.
--
Joe
The Natural Philosopher
2019-09-06 17:58:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 09:28:15 +0100
Post by nightjar
A recent study showed that, while the right wing leanings come with
age theory is true to some extent, it has also been found that there
is a generational effect as well. Not every generation starts from
the same base line and the current trend is for successive
generations to start off more left wing than their predecessors. That
means that, while members of that generation may well move to the
right as they age, they probably won't end up as far right as the
generation before them. The crossover point is not fixed.
It is also the case that political bias and Political Correctness in
education has steadily increased with time (Long March Through the
Institutions, Common Purpose, the EU
(https://ec.europa.eu/unitedkingdom/education/eu-teaching-materials_en)
etc.)
After a year or two out of education, the more intelligent ones will
see that and many will be quite annoyed about it. Also, my generation
pushed back against mainly Right-wing parents, but today's generation
have more Left-wing parents.
That is why academics display a childlike innocence in their political bias.
Post by Joe
So it could just as easily go the other way.
--
“Some people like to travel by train because it combines the slowness of
a car with the cramped public exposure of 
an airplane.”

Dennis Miller
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-07 12:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
That is why academics display a childlike innocence in their political bias.
Good to know you don't consider yourself an academic then.

And your choice of name even stranger given natural philosophy was largely
confined to academics of the time.
--
*Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine*

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Chris Green
2019-09-05 17:45:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Wells
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as we
grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities, we
become more realistic and conservative.
Maybe true of some people but by no means all. I think if anything I
have drifted slightly more left as I have got older but I've been
basically middle of the road Lib-Dem[ish] just about all my life.
--
Chris Green
·
Rod Speed
2019-09-05 20:13:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It follows
from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young ones replace
the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic
I didn’t. Boris didn’t either. Maggie didn’t either.
but as we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and
responsibilities, we become more realistic and conservative.
Corbyn and Foot didn’t.
There's a crossover point in the demographic which all these simplistic
arguments fail to acknowledge.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
Peeler
2019-09-05 20:58:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 06:13:07 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
I didn’t. Boris didn’t either. Maggie didn’t either.
Neither Boris nor Maggie are any of yours, Ozzie pest!
Post by Rod Speed
but as we grow up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and
responsibilities, we become more realistic and conservative.
Corbyn and Foot didn’t.
Neither Corbyn nor Foot are any of yours, senile trolling Ozzietard!
--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 85-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/
Brian Gaff
2019-09-06 06:42:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I personally feel that the reason they do not want an election is because in
the interim time the date will come to pass and we will be out by default.
Have you ever considered why there is actually a date in the first place?
Brian
--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
***@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young
The majority of new voters registering is *always* the young. It follows
from having a lower age limit but no upper one. The young ones replace
the old ones.
Post by Stephen Cole
(under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the "natural wastage" of older
right/leave voters.
This argument has been run so many times before, and it doesn't hold any
water. We all start out left-leaning, naive and idealistic but as we grow
up, and have families, jobs, mortgages and responsibilities, we become
more realistic and conservative. There's a crossover point in the
demographic which all these simplistic arguments fail to acknowledge.
Post by Stephen Cole
Looks like Boris' goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Strange that Corbyn has declined to put it to the test then.
Perhaps he's looked at the polls.
Norman Wells
2019-09-06 09:02:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Brian Gaff
I personally feel that the reason they do not want an election is because in
the interim time the date will come to pass and we will be out by default.
Have you ever considered why there is actually a date in the first place?
It's a question I have asked here several times. Sadly, no-one seems
able to answer it. They all assume, like many commentators, that we
decide if we want an extension and the EU automatically grants it.

That's certainly been what has happened to date. If it continues, it
means though that any 'deadline' is nothing of the sort, and setting one
is absolutely meaningless.
The Iceberg
2019-09-05 13:43:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
why do you hate the success of Britain so much that want us to be ruled by the Germans(the EUSSR)?
Rod Speed
2019-09-05 19:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority
of them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next
few weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election
will be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than
even in GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage”
of
older right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked.
And yet they were happy to elect Boris as mayor, twice.
Post by Stephen Cole
Change is coming.
It always does, but its unlikely to see that fool Corbyn as PM.
Peeler
2019-09-05 20:16:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 05:59:30 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest trollshit>
--
Bill Wright to Rot Speed:
"That confirms my opinion that you are a despicable little shit."
MID: <pjqpo3$1la0$***@gioia.aioe.org>
Spike
2019-09-06 08:32:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rod Speed
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority
of them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next
few weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election
will be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than
even in GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage”
of older right/leave voters. Change is coming.
It always does, but its unlikely to see that fool Corbyn as PM.
"The total number of UK parliamentary electors increased by just over 1
million (2.3%) between December 2015 and December 2016, this partly
reflects high levels of public engagement with the EU referendum."

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/elections/electoralregistration/bulletins/electoralstatisticsforuk/2016
--
Spike
Rod Speed
2019-09-06 10:02:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Spike
Post by Rod Speed
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority
of them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next
few weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election
will be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than
even in GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage”
of older right/leave voters. Change is coming.
It always does, but its unlikely to see that fool Corbyn as PM.
"The total number of UK parliamentary electors increased by just over 1
million (2.3%) between December 2015 and December 2016, this partly
reflects high levels of public engagement with the EU referendum."
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/elections/electoralregistration/bulletins/electoralstatisticsforuk/2016
But the polls show that Corbyn hasn’t got a hope in hell of being PM
currently.
Peeler
2019-09-06 10:25:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 6 Sep 2019 20:02:05 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
But
In auto-contradicting mode again, you abnormal senile Australian pest? LOL
--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 85-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/
Vidcapper
2019-09-06 06:12:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Lets examine that :

150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.

Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
--
Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
Stephen Cole
2019-09-06 06:58:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees, disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Stephen Cole
2019-09-06 07:48:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees, disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
ROTFL.
You are describing your political views, ie those of a lazy under achiever
who thinks the world owes him a living.
Not everyone thinks like that, not even every young person. True, those who
have been dragged out of school to festivals etc and tainted by their
parents will turn out as failures but their are others who will go on and
succeed. There have always been wasters like you. There always will be.
Where do you think the Spikes and Gareths of the world come from?
It’s ok, Brian. I know you’re very upset about how Brexit is panning out
and how badly your far right chums in Parliament are doing but console
yourself with the knowledge that the next generation are going to really
enjoy spending the proceeds of the Land Value Tax that Comrade Corbyn’s
going to levy on you, OM.

LOL!
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Jim GM4DHJ ...
2019-09-06 08:22:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees, disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
ROTFL.
You are describing your political views, ie those of a lazy under achiever
who thinks the world owes him a living.
Not everyone thinks like that, not even every young person. True, those who
have been dragged out of school to festivals etc and tainted by their
parents will turn out as failures but their are others who will go on and
succeed. There have always been wasters like you. There always will be.
Where do you think the Spikes and Gareths of the world come from?
It’s ok, Brian. I know you’re very upset about how Brexit is panning out
and how badly your far right chums in Parliament are doing but console
yourself with the knowledge that the next generation are going to really
enjoy spending the proceeds of the Land Value Tax that Comrade Corbyn’s
going to levy on you, OM.
LOL!
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
Stephen Cole
2019-09-06 08:32:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees, disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
ROTFL.
You are describing your political views, ie those of a lazy under achiever
who thinks the world owes him a living.
Not everyone thinks like that, not even every young person. True, those who
have been dragged out of school to festivals etc and tainted by their
parents will turn out as failures but their are others who will go on and
succeed. There have always been wasters like you. There always will be.
Where do you think the Spikes and Gareths of the world come from?
It’s ok, Brian. I know you’re very upset about how Brexit is panning out
and how badly your far right chums in Parliament are doing but console
yourself with the knowledge that the next generation are going to really
enjoy spending the proceeds of the Land Value Tax that Comrade Corbyn’s
going to levy on you, OM.
LOL!
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Jim GM4DHJ ...
2019-09-06 08:51:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626 constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees, disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
ROTFL.
You are describing your political views, ie those of a lazy under achiever
who thinks the world owes him a living.
Not everyone thinks like that, not even every young person. True, those who
have been dragged out of school to festivals etc and tainted by their
parents will turn out as failures but their are others who will go on and
succeed. There have always been wasters like you. There always will be.
Where do you think the Spikes and Gareths of the world come from?
It’s ok, Brian. I know you’re very upset about how Brexit is panning out
and how badly your far right chums in Parliament are doing but console
yourself with the knowledge that the next generation are going to really
enjoy spending the proceeds of the Land Value Tax that Comrade Corbyn’s
going to levy on you, OM.
LOL!
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
....in the 70's labour taxed us all until out pips squeaked......when
maggie got in income tax went down.....but tax on goods went up......so
who did that benefit?.....those with high incomes....you can only buy so
much and their income tax went down so the rich were beter off and the
poor were hammered.....just the way I see it.....
Jim GM4DHJ ...
2019-09-06 08:52:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
150k you say, but young voters tend to have low turnout, being generous,
say 60%, so only 90k actual votes - spread across 626
constituencies,
that's less than 150 each.
Then, not all of them will vote Labour - say 2/3rds which leaves Labour
with a net benefit of just 50 votes. Just 8 seats were won by that
margin in 2017, and only 2 of those were Tory, so that 150k really won't
make much difference at all...
We’ll see. The broad feeling amongst the newly-of-voting-age group seems to
be one of quite passionate politicisation, due to growing up through Tory
austerity, suffering under colossal university fees,
disenfranchisement wrt
Brexit vote, fear at environmental collapse, and so on. These kids are
angry and now they’ve got the vote we should expect them to use it.
ROTFL.
You are describing your political views, ie those of a lazy under achiever
who thinks the world owes him a living.
Not everyone thinks like that, not even every young person. True, those who
have been dragged out of school to festivals etc and tainted by their
parents will turn out as failures but their are others who will go on and
succeed. There have always been wasters like you. There always will be.
Where do you think the Spikes and Gareths of the world come from?
It’s ok, Brian. I know you’re very upset about how Brexit is panning out
and how badly your far right chums in Parliament are doing but console
yourself with the knowledge that the next generation are going to really
enjoy spending the proceeds of the Land Value Tax that Comrade Corbyn’s
going to levy on you, OM.
LOL!
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
....in the 70's labour taxed us all until out pips squeaked......when
maggie got in income tax went down.....but tax on goods went up......so
who did that benefit?.....those with high incomes....you can only buy so
much and their income tax went down so the rich were beter off and the
poor were hammered.....just the way I see it.....
so am I right or am I right ? ......
Vidcapper
2019-09-06 09:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
AS always that sounds very nice, until it's *you* they come after...
--
Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
Spike
2019-09-06 10:08:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
AS always that sounds very nice, until it's *you* they come after...
Cole has never yet managed to grasp that Labour governments 'come after'
everyone, especially the poor - but he was born after such interesting
times as the Winter of Discontent and has turned a blind eye to Blair's
multiple Middle-East wars of aggrandisement.
--
Spike
Jim GM4DHJ ...
2019-09-06 10:19:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vidcapper
Post by Stephen Cole
Post by Jim GM4DHJ ...
that is all the know how to do...tax and spend on layabouts ....
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re going to
redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
AS always that sounds very nice, until it's *you* they come after...
cole will never make that much to be bothered.....
Joe
2019-09-06 13:25:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
Post by Stephen Cole
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re
going to redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
--
Joe
Roger Hayter
2019-09-06 14:39:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
It's called "redistribution of wealth", Jim. Specifically, we're
going to redistribute Brian's wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
On the contrary, it very frequently does. Have you, for instance, read
the seminal works of Karl Marx on the subject?
--
Roger Hayter
The Natural Philosopher
2019-09-06 17:59:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Hayter
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
It's called "redistribution of wealth", Jim. Specifically, we're
going to redistribute Brian's wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
On the contrary, it very frequently does. Have you, for instance, read
the seminal works of Karl Marx on the subject?
No mention of wealth creation anyehere in Marx
--
“Some people like to travel by train because it combines the slowness of
a car with the cramped public exposure of 
an airplane.”

Dennis Miller
Roger Hayter
2019-09-06 19:01:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Roger Hayter
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
It's called "redistribution of wealth", Jim. Specifically, we're
going to redistribute Brian's wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
On the contrary, it very frequently does. Have you, for instance, read
the seminal works of Karl Marx on the subject?
No mention of wealth creation anyehere in Marx
Oh yes, just like he completely forgot to mention social class.
--
Roger Hayter
Rambo
2019-09-06 18:05:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Hayter
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
It's called "redistribution of wealth", Jim. Specifically, we're
going to redistribute Brian's wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
On the contrary, it very frequently does. Have you, for instance, read
the seminal works of Karl Marx on the subject?
Unfortunately the works of Karl Marx are not published in the Sun or
the Daily Mail. The masses believe what they are told by the
capitalists.
The Natural Philosopher
2019-09-07 07:56:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rambo
Post by Roger Hayter
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
It's called "redistribution of wealth", Jim. Specifically, we're
going to redistribute Brian's wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
On the contrary, it very frequently does. Have you, for instance, read
the seminal works of Karl Marx on the subject?
Unfortunately the works of Karl Marx are not published in the Sun or
the Daily Mail. The masses believe what they are told by the
capitalists.
And the psedo intellectals believe in what they are told by te radical
,arxists, who always lie.
Marxs view of production is completely invalidated by the 20th century
rise of automated production.
He saw wealth as ultimately produced by human labour. It isn't. Today
its produced by a few clever people designing machines that run on
fossil fuel that have totally replaced labour.

At a stroke Marxism has becime totally and utterly irrelevant along with
the so called working class it purported to represent.

Which is why socialism has been modified and adapted to appeal to the
people who think they are smart - the technicians of the world, and
given a moral ringe to appeal to women and feminized men.
--
If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will
eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such
time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic
and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally
important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for
the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the
truth is the greatest enemy of the State.

Joseph Goebbels
The Natural Philosopher
2019-09-06 17:59:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On 6 Sep 2019 08:32:24 GMT
Post by Stephen Cole
It’s called “redistribution of wealth”, Jim. Specifically, we’re
going to redistribute Brian’s wealth, Jim. Thanks, Jim.
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.

Marx simply treats it as if it is just 'there'
--
“Some people like to travel by train because it combines the slowness of
a car with the cramped public exposure of 
an airplane.”

Dennis Miller
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-07 12:41:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Joe
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.
Thought you objected to Blair being so wealthy?
--
*Isn't it a bit unnerving that doctors call what they do "practice?"

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Joe
2019-09-07 15:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 13:41:19 +0100
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Joe
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.
Thought you objected to Blair being so wealthy?
How much of it did he create? As far as I can see, he just persuades
others to hand over their wealth to him. A talent, certainly, but not
wealth creation.
--
Joe
Stephen Cole
2019-09-07 17:00:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 13:41:19 +0100
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Joe
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.
Thought you objected to Blair being so wealthy?
How much of it did he create? As far as I can see, he just persuades
others to hand over their wealth to him. A talent, certainly, but not
wealth creation.
Socialists have a 'blind eye' when it comes to their own wealth, it is
only when others have money they have a problem. They solve that problem
by grabbing it by what ever means they can.
Tony Blair is not a socialist, Brian. HTH.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-08 12:02:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 13:41:19 +0100
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Joe
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.
Thought you objected to Blair being so wealthy?
How much of it did he create? As far as I can see, he just persuades
others to hand over their wealth to him. A talent, certainly, but not
wealth creation.
Just like Boris then?

But good to know you think only those who actually make things, like the
workers, should be wealthy. Or am I missing something?
--
*Do they ever shut up on your planet?

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Joe
2019-09-08 13:08:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 08 Sep 2019 13:02:16 +0100
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by Joe
On Sat, 07 Sep 2019 13:41:19 +0100
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Joe
Why does the Left never talk about *creating* wealth?
Because it hasn't a clue how to do it.
Thought you objected to Blair being so wealthy?
How much of it did he create? As far as I can see, he just persuades
others to hand over their wealth to him. A talent, certainly, but
not wealth creation.
Just like Boris then?
But good to know you think only those who actually make things, like
the workers, should be wealthy. Or am I missing something?
I don't know. Try quoting the part where I said that, and I'll let you
know.
--
Joe
Stephen Cole
2019-09-06 06:58:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
If you’d attended a proper Uni, you’d know why this happens at this time of
year.
Hint: students go off to Uni soon. They register to vote in their Uni town.
They can even be registered in two places, provided they only vote in one.
As can those with second homes ;-)
Why is anyone over 18 not already registered, it is a legal requirement.
A few may have a valid reason but hardly a significant number.
Still, you only did Intermediate Maths so the sums are probably beyond you.
Oh, Brian. You really are a reactionary little fuckwit, eh? Hint; the
comparative data is online, OM. You really should get your facts straight
before you shit the bed like this. HTH. YFI.
--
M0TEY // STC
www.twitter.com/ukradioamateur
Tufnell Park
2019-09-06 18:08:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
There's nothing new in that, you always get new voters registering when
an election is pending.

Older people are usually already registered.

Simples!
Spike
2019-09-07 08:09:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tufnell Park
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
There's nothing new in that, you always get new voters registering when
an election is pending. Older people are usually already registered. Simples!
The surge in voter registrations in 2016 didn't help Comrade Cole's
Cause either:

"The total number of UK parliamentary electors increased by just over 1
million (2.3%) between December 2015 and December 2016, this partly
reflects high levels of public engagement with the EU referendum."

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/elections/electoralregistration/bulletins/electoralstatisticsforuk/2016
--
Spike
Tufnell Park
2019-09-06 18:14:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the “natural wastage” of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris’ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Not all of the new registrants will be 'left leaning' by any means. This
is just a myth propounded by Remainers.
Dave Plowman (News)
2019-09-07 12:42:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tufnell Park
Post by Stephen Cole
150,000 people have registered to vote since Monday, with the majority of
them being young (under 45s). So, if that keeps up through the next few
weeks, the demographics at the next (very imminent) general election will
be somewhat more considerably left-leaning and remain-leaning than even in
GE2017, particularly so when you factor in the ”natural wastage• of older
right/leave voters.
Looks like Boris‘ goose is cooked. Change is coming.
Not all of the new registrants will be 'left leaning' by any means. This
is just a myth propounded by Remainers.
Very true, given how many kids Rees-Mogg has.
--
*What do you call a dinosaur with an extensive vocabulary? A thesaurus.*

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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